See also: Ding, díng, dìng, dīng, dǐng, and dìŋ

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English dingen, dyngen (strong verb), from Old English *dingan (to ding), from Proto-Germanic *dingwaną (to beat), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰen- (to beat, push). Related to Old English dengan (to ding, beat, strike, weak verb) and Old Norse dengja (to hammer, weak verb); both from Proto-Germanic *dangijaną (to beat, hammer, peen), causative of *dingwaną. Cognate with Icelandic dengja (to hammer), Swedish dänga (to bang, beat), Danish dænge (to bang, beat), German tengeln, dengeln (to peen).

NounEdit

ding (plural dings)

  1. (informal) Very minor damage, a small dent or chip.
    • 2007 September, “Ding Repairs”, BBC Wales, archived on 5 October 2014:
      If you surf regularly, then you're going to ding your board. Here's a rough guide on how to repair them... If the ding is on the rail, run tape across the ding conforming to the rail curve, leaving a gap to pour in resin and make sure it is sealed to prevent resin escaping and forming dribbles.
  2. (colloquial) A rejection.
    I just got my first ding letter.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

ding (third-person singular simple present dings, present participle dinging, simple past dinged or (obsolete) dang, past participle dinged or (obsolete) dung)

  1. (transitive) To hit or strike.
  2. To dash; to throw violently.
  3. (transitive) To inflict minor damage upon, especially by hitting or striking.
  4. (transitive, colloquial) To fire or reject.
    His top school dinged him last week.
  5. (transitive, colloquial) To deduct, as points, from another, in the manner of a penalty; to penalize.
    My bank dinged me three bucks for using their competitor's ATM.
    • 2015 August 7, Ron Lieber, “Bringing paternity leave into the mainstream [print version: Paid leave expands for fathers, but will there be any takers?, International New York Times, 10 August 2015, p. 14]”, in The New York Times[1]:
      [] [E]mployees don't feel like they're going to get dinged on performance reviews because they had the same goals as a guy who had been there all 12 months with no leave.
  6. (transitive, golf) To mishit (a golf ball).
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Onomatopoeic. Compare ding-dong,

NounEdit

ding (plural dings)

  1. The high-pitched resonant sound of a bell.
  2. (colloquial, role-playing games, especially computer games) The act of levelling up.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

ding (third-person singular simple present dings, present participle dinging, simple past and past participle dinged)

  1. (intransitive) To make high-pitched sound like a bell.
    • (Can we date this quote by Washington Irving and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      The fretful tinkling of the convent bell evermore dinging among the mountain echoes.
  2. (transitive) To keep repeating; impress by reiteration, with reference to the monotonous striking of a bell.
    • 1884, Oswald Crawfurd, English comic dramatists
      If I'm to have any good, let it come of itself; not keep dinging it, dinging it into one so.
  3. (intransitive, colloquial, role-playing games, especially computer games) To level up.
See alsoEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Romanized from Mandarin (dǐng).

 
a ding with an animal mask

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

ding (plural dings or ding)

  1. An ancient Chinese vessel with legs and a lid.
TranslationsEdit

AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch ding, from Old Dutch thing, from Proto-Germanic *þingą.

NounEdit

ding (plural dinge)

  1. thing
    • 2016, “Dinge Raak Warm”, in Sal Jy Met My Dans?[2], South Africa, performed by Kurt Darren:
      Dinge raak warm, warm.
      Things touch warm, warm.

CimbrianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German ding, from Old High German thing, from Proto-Germanic *þingą (appointment; meeting; matter). Cognate with German Ding, English thing.

NounEdit

ding n (plural dingardiminutive dingale)

  1. (Sette Comuni) thing, object

DeclensionEdit

Usage notesEdit

Most often used in the diminutive.

ReferencesEdit

  • “ding” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /dɪŋ/
  • Rhymes: -ɪŋ
  • (file)

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch dinc, from Old Dutch thing, from Proto-Germanic *þingą.

NounEdit

ding n (plural dingen, diminutive dingetje n)

  1. matter, thing
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Afrikaans: ding

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

VerbEdit

ding

  1. first-person singular present indicative of dingen
  2. imperative of dingen

IrishEdit

 
ding

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /dʲɪɲ/, /dʲɪɲɟ/

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Irish ding (wedge).

NounEdit

ding f (genitive singular dinge, nominative plural dingeacha)

  1. wedge
  2. thickset person
DeclensionEdit
SynonymsEdit
  • (both senses): ginn (Cois Fharraige)
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Irish dingid (press, force), from Proto-Celtic *dingeti (knead, form, press), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰinéǵʰti, nasal infix present of *dʰeyǵʰ- (to knead, form).

VerbEdit

ding (present analytic dingeann, future analytic dingfidh, verbal noun dingeadh, past participle dingthe)

  1. (transitive) wedge; pack tightly, stuff
  2. (transitive) make compact; knit, knead
ConjugationEdit
Derived termsEdit
  • dingire m (wedging implement; light hammer)
Related termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

ding f (genitive singular dinge, nominative plural dingeacha)

  1. dint
DeclensionEdit

VerbEdit

ding (present analytic dingeann, future analytic dingfidh, verbal noun dingeadh, past participle dingthe)

  1. (transitive) dint
ConjugationEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
ding dhing nding
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


MandarinEdit

RomanizationEdit

ding

  1. Nonstandard spelling of dīng.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of díng.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of dǐng.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of dìng.

Usage notesEdit

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Middle EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

ding

  1. Alternative form of dingen

ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Probably from Old Norse dengja (to beat, thrash). Cognate with Swedish dänga, Danish dænge.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ding (third-person singular present dings, present participle dingin, past dang, past participle dung)

  1. to beat, hit, strike
  2. to beat, excel, defeat
    • 1817, Walter Scott, Rob Roy, II.3:
      ‘Gude help him!—twa lines o' Davie Lindsay would ding a' he ever clerkit.’

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Tavringer Romani dinalo, dingalo (crazy), from Romani dinelo (stupid, crazy). Related to Sanskrit दीन (dīna, weak).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ding (comparative mer ding, superlative mest ding)

  1. (colloquial) mad, crazy
    1968, Peter Himmelstrand (lyrics and music), “Det börjar verka kärlek, banne mej”, performed by Claes-Göran Hederström:
    Jag fattar ingenting / jag är väl lite ding.
    I just don’t get it / I guess I’m a little bit daft.

Usage notesEdit

  • The neuter form is usually avoided, compare rädd.

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of ding
Indefinite Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular ding mer ding mest ding
Neuter singular dingt mer dingt mest dingt
Plural dinga mer dinga mest dinga
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 dinge mer dinge mest dinge
All dinga mer dinga mest dinga
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in the predicative.

ReferencesEdit

  • ding in Svensk ordbok (SO)
  • “ding” in Gerd Carling, Romani i svenskan: Storstadsslang och standardspråk, Stockholm: Carlsson, 2005, →ISBN, page 78.