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EnglishEdit

NounEdit

grav (plural gravs)

  1. A unit of force or acceleration equal to the standard acceleration of free fall.
    • 1968, Fritz Leiber, A specter is haunting Texas:
      My heart was pounding as it pumped blood to my brain — no small job, considering my height and the gravs.
    • 2009, Jack Davis, ‎Will Elder, ‎Al Jaffee, Humbug, →ISBN, page 32:
      Proceed at a speed of four light years after accelerating thirteen gravs per millisecond.”
    • 2014, Gregory Benford, ‎Larry Niven, Shipstar: A Science Fiction Novel, →ISBN:
      . “They're small, can maneuver faster than we can,”Clare said. “Accelerating at three gravs, too.”
  2. (science fiction) An artificial gravity generator.
    • 1950, Nelson Bond, Lancelot Biggs: Spaceman, →ISBN, page 76:
      Since there is no such thing as top or bottom in space, the ship's artificial gravs hold you to the floor no matter which end of the vessel points which way.
    • 2007, L. E. Modesitt, Jr., The Ecolitan Enigma, →ISBN:
      ... We will be going to low-gravity just before jump. Passengers should be firmly strapped in at this time." "Good," murmured Muerotte. "Cutting gravs...brace yourself.
    • 2010, L. E. Modesitt, Jr., The Parafaith War, →ISBN:
      Trystin shut down the ventilation system and shifted the last of the power for gravs into the thrusters.
  3. (science fiction) An anti-gravity device.
    • 1992, Bill Baldwin, The Defenders:
      A starship thundered invisibly close overhead, its gravs at full lift-off power.
    • 1992, Gardner Dozois, Geodesic Dreams: The Best Short Fiction Of Gardner Dozois, →ISBN, page 83:
      The orbot was a speck, a clot, a ball, a toy. It was gliding silently in on gravs, directly overhead.
    • 2008, Martin Rait, FSpace Roleplaying Conspiracy Convention Skills Guide v1.1, →ISBN, page 7:
      Air cars include any vehicle which are grav powered and are capable of flying, but unlike aeroplanes they handle similar to normal ground cars.
    • 2011, R Richard, Second Chance King of Avuls, →ISBN, page 7:
      I set things up for the grav sled support and the Averonian operation.
    • 2011, J. E. Murphy, Sanctuary, →ISBN, page 317:
      With the gravs, I can land in ten seconds and be cutting a door for you at the same time.

DanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse grǫf, gröf, from Proto-Germanic *grabą, *grabō (grave, trench, ditch), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰrābʰ- (to dig, scratch, scrape). Compare Norwegian and Swedish grav, Icelandic gröf, English grave, West Frisian grêf, Low German Graf, Graff, Dutch graf, German Grab.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɡraːv/, [ɡ̊ʁɑwˀ]

NounEdit

grav c (singular definite graven, plural indefinite grave)

  1. grave, tomb
  2. pit, ditch, trench
InflectionEdit

Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See grave.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɡraːv/, [ɡ̊ʁɑwˀ]

VerbEdit

grav

  1. imperative of grave

Norwegian BokmålEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse grǫf

NounEdit

grav f or m (definite singular grava or graven, indefinite plural graver, definite plural gravene)

  1. a grave (place of burial)
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

grav

  1. imperative of grave

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse grǫf. Akin to English grave.

NounEdit

grav f (definite singular grava, indefinite plural graver, definite plural gravene)

  1. a grave (place of burial)
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

grav

  1. imperative of grava and grave

ReferencesEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French grave, Latin gravis. Compare the inherited doublet greu.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

grav m or n (feminine singular gravă, masculine plural gravi, feminine and neuter plural grave)

  1. grave, serious
  2. critical, important, weighty
  3. severe, stern
  4. earnest
  5. baritone, low in pitch, tone

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

AdverbEdit

grav

  1. gravely

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse grǫf, gröf, from Proto-Germanic *grabą, *grabō (grave, trench, ditch), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰrābʰ- (to dig, scratch, scrape). Compare Norwegian and Danish grav, Icelandic gröf, English grave, Dutch graf, German Grab.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

grav

  1. severe, as in a mistake or a congenital disorder
  2. grave (accent)

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of grav
Indefinite Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular grav gravare gravast
Neuter singular gravt gravare gravast
Plural grava gravare gravast
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 grave gravare gravaste
All grava gravare gravaste
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in the predicative.

NounEdit

grav c

  1. a grave

DeclensionEdit

Declension of grav 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative grav graven gravar gravarna
Genitive gravs gravens gravars gravarnas

Related termsEdit