See also: graaf, Graf, gráf, and -graf

English

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From German Graf (count). Doublet of graaf and grave.

Noun

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graf (plural grafs)

  1. (uncommon, now historical) A German or Austrian count.
    • 1843 February, "Graf de Tropp", in Fraser's Magazine for Town and Country, volume 27, [books.google.com/books?id=9ZUtAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA200 page 200]:
      Without ceremony, the Graf, on his entering the drawing-room, seated himself at the piano-forte, and proposed affording his new friends "a leetle example" how music was performed in Hungary.
Coordinate terms
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Etymology 2

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Phonetic respelling of clipping of paragraph.

Noun

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graf (plural grafs)

  1. (journalism, slang) A paragraph.

Etymology 3

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Noun

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graf (uncountable)

  1. Alternative spelling of graff (graffiti)
    • 2002, Janice Rahn, Painting Without Permission: Hip-hop Graffiti Subculture, page 7:
      For example, a current trend in graf is to simulate a three-dimensional effect (see Figure 1.2). No one graf artist is associated with having developed this method.
    • 2012, P. D. Smith, City: A Guidebook for the Urban Age, page 84:
      Naar had been photographing the 'palimpsest of writings and marks on walls' since 1955 and he says his interest in graf is 'political, in the Greek sense of engagement with the life of the "polis", or city-state'.
Derived terms
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Anagrams

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Afrikaans

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Etymology

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From Dutch graf and graft (see the plural).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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graf (plural grafte)

  1. grave

Albanian

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Alternative forms

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Verb

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graf (aorist grafa, participle grafë)

  1. Gheg form of grah (to incite; bellow, roar; rattle)[1]

References

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  1. ^ Orel, Vladimir E. (1998) “graf ~ grah”, in Albanian Etymological Dictionary, Leiden, Boston, Köln: Brill, →ISBN, page 121

Catalan

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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graf m (plural grafs)

  1. (mathematics) graph

Further reading

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Czech

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graf
 
graf

Etymology

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Derived from Ancient Greek γράφω (gráphō).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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graf m inan

  1. graph (mathematical diagram)
  2. (graph theory) graph (nodes and edges connecting the nodes)
  3. chart (graphical presentation)

Declension

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This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Derived terms

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See also

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Further reading

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  • graf in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • graf in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Danish

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Etymology

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From English graph.

Noun

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graf

  1. graph, visualization of an equation or a function
  2. (graph theory) graph

Declension

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Derived terms

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Dutch

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Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Middle Dutch graf, from Old Dutch *graf, from Proto-Germanic *grabą, *grabō (grave, trench, ditch).

Noun

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graf n (plural graven, diminutive grafje n)

  1. grave
Derived terms
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Descendants
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  • Afrikaans: graf
  • Negerhollands: graf
  • Papiamentu: graf

Etymology 2

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From French grave (serious, grave). Most likely influenced by Dutch erg which can mean "serious, grave" as well as "very". The alternative form graaf (very), also slang, has the same origin and meaning, but stays closer to the original French pronunciation.

Adverb

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graf

  1. (slang, Belgium) very
    Dat is graf duur — That's very expensive

French

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Noun

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graf m (plural grafs)

  1. (slang) Clipping of graffiti.
    L’usage du tag et du graf s’affirme d’autant plus comme un pouvoir de communication tribale constituant un code secret.
    The use of tags and graffiti is establishing itself all the more as a means of tribal communication constituting a secret code.

Further reading

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Icelandic

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Noun

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graf n (genitive singular grafs, nominative plural gröf)

  1. graph, chart

Declension

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Indonesian

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Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

Etymology

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Borrowed from English graph.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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graf (plural graf-graf, first-person possessive grafku, second-person possessive grafmu, third-person possessive grafnya)

  1. (linguistics, typography) graph: A graphical unit on the token-level, the abstracted fundamental shape of a character or letter as distinct from its ductus (realization in a particular typeface or handwriting on the instance-level) and as distinct by a grapheme on the type-level by not fundamentally distinguishing meaning.
    Synonym: huruf
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Further reading

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Irish

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Etymology

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Borrowed from English graph.

Noun

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graf m (genitive singular graif, nominative plural graif)

  1. graph, chart

Declension

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Derived terms

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Verb

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graf (present analytic grafann, future analytic grafaidh, verbal noun grafadh, past participle grafa)

  1. (transitive, intransitive, literary) write; draw, sketch
  2. (transitive, mathematics, statistics) graph, plot, chart

Conjugation

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Mutation

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Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
graf ghraf ngraf
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References

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Kashubian

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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Borrowed from German Graf.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈɡraf/
  • Rhymes: -af
  • Syllabification: graf

Noun

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graf m inan

  1. count
    Synonym: hrabia

Declension

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Further reading

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  • Sychta, Bernard (1967) “grafa”, in Słownik gwar kaszubskich [Dictionary of Kashubian dialects] (in Polish), volumes 1 (A – Ǵ), Wrocław: Ossolineum, page 354
  • Jan Trepczyk (1994) “hrabia”, in Słownik polsko-kaszubski (in Kashubian), volumes 1–2
  • Eùgeniusz Gòłąbk (2011) “hrabia”, in Słownik Polsko-Kaszubski / Słowôrz Pòlskò-Kaszëbsczi[1]
  • graf”, in Internetowi Słowôrz Kaszëbsczégò Jãzëka [Internet Dictionary of the Kashubian Language], Fundacja Kaszuby, 2022

Middle English

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Noun

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graf

  1. Alternative form of grave

Norwegian Bokmål

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Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology

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Borrowed from English graph.

Noun

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graf m (definite singular grafen, indefinite plural grafer, definite plural grafene)

  1. graph (diagram)

References

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Norwegian Nynorsk

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Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology

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Borrowed from English graph.

Noun

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graf m (definite singular grafen, indefinite plural grafar, definite plural grafane)

  1. graph (diagram)

References

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Old English

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Etymology

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Uncertain, lacking cognates in other Germanic languages. Perhaps from grafan (to dig), similar to drāf (drove) and drifan.[1]

Pronunciation

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Noun

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grāf ?

  1. grove

Declension

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This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants

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References

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  1. ^ Puppel, S. (2010). Language History and Linguistic Modelling: A Festschrift for Jacek Fisiak on His 60th Birthday. Germany: De Gruyter., p. 134-135

Old Spanish

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Pronunciation

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Adjective

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graf m or f (plural graves)

  1. Apocopic form of grave; serious; grave; major
    • c. 1200, Almerich, Fazienda de Ultramar, f. 17v:
      e la coſa graf q̃ nã podrã iudgar adugã la aty. e iudgar laas.
      And any grave matter they cannot judge themselves they will bring to you, so that you may judge it.

Polish

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Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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Inherited from Old Polish grof. Doublet of grabia and hrabia.

Noun

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graf m pers

  1. (historical) count (male ruler of a county)
    Synonyms: grabia, hrabia
Declension
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Derived terms
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adjective
nouns

Etymology 2

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Internationalism; compare English graph, French graphe, German Graph, ultimately from Ancient Greek γράφειν (gráphein).

Noun

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graf m inan

  1. (mathematics) graph
    Hypernym: wykres
Declension
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Derived terms
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adjective

Etymology 3

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Clipping of autograf.

Noun

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graf m inan

  1. (slang) autograph
    Synonym: autograf
Declension
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Further reading

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  • graf in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • graf in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian

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Etymology 1

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Borrowed from French graph.

Noun

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graf n (plural grafuri)

  1. graph
Declension
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Etymology 2

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Borrowed from German Graf.

Noun

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graf m (plural grafi)

  1. count
Declension
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Scottish Gaelic

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Noun

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graf m (genitive singular grafa, plural grafaichean)

  1. graph

Derived terms

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Serbo-Croatian

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Noun

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grȁf m (Cyrillic spelling гра̏ф)

  1. (mathematics) graph
  2. (graph theory) graph

Declension

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Swedish

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Etymology 1

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From English graph, shortened from graphic formula.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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graf c

  1. (mathematics) graph, the set  
  2. (graph theory) graph; an ordered set (V,E) of edges which joins to the vertices such that each of the edge's ends is located at a vertex
Declension
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Declension of graf 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative graf grafen grafer graferna
Genitive grafs grafens grafers grafernas
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See also
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Etymology 2

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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graf c

  1. Obsolete spelling of grav.
Declension
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Declension of graf 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative graf grafven grafvar grafvarna
Genitive grafs grafvens grafvars grafvarnas

Volapük

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Noun

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graf (nominative plural grafs)

  1. count (ruler of a county)

Declension

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Derived terms

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