See also: tömb

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

 
Governor John R. Tanner's tomb

From Middle English tombe, toumbe, borrowed from Old French tombe, from Latin tumba from Ancient Greek τύμβος (túmbos, a sepulchral mound, tomb, grave), probably from Proto-Indo-European *tewh₂- (to swell).

The verb is from Middle English tomben.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /tuːm/ 
  • (US) IPA(key): /tum/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -uːm

NounEdit

tomb (plural tombs)

  1. A small building (or "vault") for the remains of the dead, with walls, a roof, and (if it is to be used for more than one corpse) a door. It may be partly or wholly in the ground (except for its entrance) in a cemetery, or it may be inside a church proper or in its crypt. Single tombs may be permanently sealed; those for families (or other groups) have doors for access whenever needed.
  2. A pit in which the dead body of a human being is deposited; a grave.
  3. One who keeps secrets.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Irish: tuama
  • Maori: toma

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

tomb (third-person singular simple present tombs, present participle tombing, simple past and past participle tombed)

  1. (transitive) To bury.

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From tombar.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tomb m (plural tombs)

  1. turn (change of direction)
  2. turn, twist (movement around an axis)
  3. turn (change of temperament or circumstance)
  4. walk, stroll

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

tomb (plural tombes)

  1. Alternative form of tombe (tomb)