Open main menu
See also: Heroin, heróín, and hê-rô-in

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Since the 1890s, from German Heroin, originally a trademark said to derive from Ancient Greek ἥρως (hḗrōs, hero) (due to the feelings of power and exaltation while under the influence of the drug) and the suffix -in (-ine). Alternative explained as reference to the heroic school of medicine[1].

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈhɛɹoʊ.ɪn/
  • (file)
  • Homophone: heroine
  • Rhymes: -ɪn

NounEdit

heroin (countable and uncountable, plural heroins)

  1. A powerful and addictive drug derived from opium producing intense euphoria classed as an illegal narcotic in most of the world. [from late 19th century]
    • 1967, Lou Reed (music), “Heroin”, in The Velvet Underground & Nico, performed by The Velvet Underground:
      Wow, that heroin is in my blood / And the blood is in my head / Yeah, thank God that I'm good as dead / Ooohhh, thank your God that I'm not aware / And thank God that I just don't care / And I guess I just don't know
    • 2009: Stuart Heritage, Hecklerspray, Friday the 22nd of May in 2009 at 1 o’clock p.m., “Jon & Kate Latest: People You Don’t Know Do Crap You Don’t Care About
      The reason why Jon & Kate Plus 8 is such a hot topic is because it might all be a sham. It’s been claimed that Jon has a string of mistresses, that Kate had an affair with her bodyguard and that Baby Number Six is actually a shaved Ewok with a catastrophic heroin addiction. Or something.
    • 2016, John Oliver, “Opiods”, in Last Week Tonight with John Oliver, season 3, episode 27, written by Tim Carvell; Josh Gondelman; Dan Gurewitch; Jeff Maurer; Ben Silva; Will Tracy; Jill Twiss; Seena Vali; Julie Weiner, HBO, Warner Bros. Television:
      Yeah, it does, though, it does. Heroin works basically everywhere because it’s heroin. It’s not a cellphone. Heroin has full coverage.
    • 2017, John Oliver, “Confederacy”, in Last Week Tonight with John Oliver, season 4, episode 26, written by Tim Carvell; Josh Gondelman; Dan Gurewitch; Jeff Maurer; Ben Silva; Will Tracy; Jill Twiss; Seena Vali; Julie Weiner, HBO, Warner Bros. Television:
      Okay, wel-, I’ll tell you where it stops: somewhere! Anytime someone asks, “Where does it stop?”, the answer is always fucking somewhere! You might let your kid have Twizzlers, but not inject black tar heroin! You d-You don’t just go, “Well, after the Twizzlers, where does it stop?”!

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Marcus Aurin (September 2000), “Chasing the Dragon: The Cultural Metamorphosis of Opium in the United States, 1825-1935”, in Medical Anthropology Quarterly, volume 14, issue 3, DOI:10.1525/maq.2000.14.3.414, pages 414-441

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


CzechEdit

NounEdit

heroin m

  1. heroin

SynonymsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • heroin in Kartotéka Novočeského lexikálního archivu
  • heroin in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

DanishEdit

 
Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia da

NounEdit

heroin c, n (singular definite heroinen or heroinet, uncountable)

  1. heroin

FinnishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

heroin

  1. Instructive plural form of hera.

JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

heroin

  1. Rōmaji transcription of ヘロイン

Serbo-CroatianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /xerǒiːn/
  • Hyphenation: he‧ro‧in

NounEdit

heròīn m (Cyrillic spelling херо̀ӣн)

  1. heroin

DeclensionEdit


SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From German Heroin.

NounEdit

heroin n

  1. heroin

DeclensionEdit

Declension of heroin 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative heroin heroinet
Genitive heroins heroinets