See also: Jonk

AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch jong, from Old Dutch jung, from Proto-Germanic *jungaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂yuh₁n̥ḱós.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

jonk (attributive jong, comparative jonger, superlative jongste)

  1. young
  2. recent

Central FranconianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • jong (more recent variant, now widespread)

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German junc, from Old High German jung, from Proto-Germanic *jungaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂yuh₁n̥ḱós.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

jonk (masculine jonge, feminine jong, comparative jönger or jenger, superlative et jöngste or jengste)

  1. (many dialects) young
    Hä hät noch en jong Dochter un e jonk Enkelche.
    He has a still young daughter and a young grandchild.

LuxembourgishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German junc, from Old High German jung, from Proto-Germanic *jungaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂yuh₁n̥ḱós. The -k belongs to the uninflected stem (through final devoicing when -ng- was still a consonant cluster). Though adjectives have usually generalized the inflected stem (cf. laang, not *laank), -k has sometimes been generalized after short vowels.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

jonk (masculine jonken, neuter jonkt, comparative méi jonk, superlative am jéngsten or am jénksten)

  1. young
    Ech frot e jonke Mann, dee mer de Wee gewisen huet.
    I asked a young man who gave me directions.

DeclensionEdit

AntonymsEdit


North FrisianEdit

PronounEdit

jonk

  1. objective case of jat