See also: Jonk

AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch jong, from Middle Dutch jonc, from Old Dutch jung, from Proto-Germanic *jungaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂yuh₁n̥ḱós.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /jɔŋk/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

jonk (attributive jong, comparative jonger, superlative jongste)

  1. young
  2. recent

Central FranconianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • jong (more recent variant, now widespread)

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German junc, from Old High German jung.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

jonk (masculine jonge, feminine jong, comparative jönger or jenger, superlative et jöngste or jengste)

  1. (many dialects) young
    Hä hät noch en jong Dochter un e jonk Enkelche.
    He has a still young daughter and a young grandchild.

LimburgishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-West Germanic *jung, from Proto-Germanic *jungaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂yuh₁n̥ḱós.

Alternative formsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

jonk (masculine jonge, feminine jong, comparative jonger or jönger, superlative jongste)

  1. (Southeast Limburgish, including Eupen) young
    Antonyms: aod, (Eupen) aut

Etymology 2Edit

Fixed nominalisation of Limburgish jonk (young).

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

jonk m (plural jonges, diminutive jungske)

  1. (Southeast Limburgish, uncommon) boy, young guy

NounEdit

jonk n (plural jonge, diminutive jungske)

  1. (Southeast Limburgish) A young: a young being, especially an animal.

LuxembourgishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German junc, from Old High German jung.

The -k belongs to the uninflected stem (through final devoicing when -ng- was still a consonant cluster). Though adjectives have usually generalized the inflected stem (cf. laang, not *lank), there are exceptions with generalization of the basic form.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

jonk (masculine jonken, neuter jonkt, comparative méi jonk, superlative am jéngsten or am jénksten)

  1. young
    Ech frot e jonke Mann, dee mer de Wee gewisen huet.
    I asked a young man who gave me directions.

DeclensionEdit

AntonymsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Middle French jonc (rush), from Old French jonc, from Latin iuncus, from Proto-Italic *joinikos.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

jonk (plural jonkes) (rare)

  1. (nautical) An old cable or rope.
  2. A rush (plant of the family Juncaceae)
  3. A rush basket.

DescendantsEdit

  • English: junk

ReferencesEdit


North FrisianEdit

PronounEdit

jonk

  1. objective case of jat

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Perhaps borrowed from English junk.

NounEdit

jonk n

  1. (slang) brown heroin

DeclensionEdit

Declension of jonk 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative jonk jonket
Genitive jonks jonkets

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit