EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.
Particularly: “from -ing, etc.”

SuffixEdit

-in

  1. (proscribed, eye dialect) Alternative form of -ing.
  2. (biochemistry) Used, as a modification of -ine, to form the names of a variety of types of compound; examples include proteins (globulin), carbohydrates (dextrin), dyes (alizarin) and others (vanillin).
  3. (Geordie) Used to form the present participles of verbs.
    gannin as in "Are ye gannin or what?"
  4. (Geordie) Used to form verbal nouns from verbs.
    myekin as in "The myekin of the boat."

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-in f (plural -innen, diminutive -innetje)

  1. a suffix indicating the female counterpart of the stem

Derived termsEdit


FinnishEdit

SuffixEdit

-in

  1. (case suffix) Suffix variant for the illative singular, see -Vn.
  2. (case suffix) Instructive case suffix. Actually this is -n but it almost invariably added to the plural stem hence seen as -in even if the meaning is fundamentally singular.
    The instructive case indicates method and is often glossed in English using the word with.
    kaksin käsin = with two hands
    paljain silmin = with bare eyes
    pitkin askelin = with long steps
    hyvissä ajoin = in good time
  3. (possessive, poetic) A variant for the first-person singular possessive suffix -ni.
    rakkaani = rakkain

Usage notesEdit

  • (case suffix for instructive): The suffix is appended to the genitive singular stem but it causes the same changes as the plural marker -i-. Therefore, it's equivalent to append just -n to the (possibly weak) plural stem, eg. from the inessive plural.

SuffixEdit

-in

  1. (case suffix, rare) Forms the genitive plural.

Usage notesEdit

  • Suffixed to the nominative singular but the final -i changes to -e-.
  • Note, however, that the more common suffix for the genitive plural is -en added to the plural stem ending with i or j. A link consonant d is also also sometimes present.
  • Nowadays This suffix is rare and usually gives archaic tone. Certain names, however, retain this, eg. Yhdysvaltain, from Yhdysvallat (singular stem Yhdysvalta-), where also the more modern form Yhdysvaltojen is possible.

See alsoEdit

SuffixEdit

-in

  1. Forms superlative adjectives.
    heikko (weak) → heikoin (weakest)
    matala (low, shallow) → matalin (lowest, shallowest)
    ruma (ugly) → rumin (ugliest)
    suuri (large, big) → suurin (largest, biggest)

DeclensionEdit

Back vowel harmony declension (includes vowels a, o, u)

Front vowel harmony declension (includes vowels ä, ö, y)

See alsoEdit

SuffixEdit

-in

  1. Forms inanimate instrumental nouns from verbs.

Derived termsEdit

DeclensionEdit

Back vowel harmony declension (includes vowels a, o, u)

Front vowel harmony declension (includes vowels ä, ö, y)

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin -inus

SuffixEdit

-in

  1. adjectival suffix
    enfantin, from enfant
  2. nominal suffix
    crottin, from crotte

Derived termsEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-in (Plural: -innen)

  1. creates the female form of persons or occupations; umlaut takes place on some occasions
    Autor ("[male] author") → Autorin ("female author")
    Bauer ("[male] farmer") → Bäuerin ("female farmer")

Derived termsEdit


IdoEdit

SuffixEdit

-in

  1. See -in-.

JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

-in

  1. rōmaji reading of いん

Middle DutchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch *-īn, from Proto-Germanic *-īnaz.

SuffixEdit

-in

  1. -en; creates adjectives for the material of which something is made.

Derived termsEdit

Category Middle Dutch words suffixed with -in not found

DescendantsEdit


Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *-īnaz.

SuffixEdit

-īn

  1. used to create adjectives from nouns
    steinīn (made of stone) from stein (stone)
    guldīn (golden) from gold (gold)

DescendantsEdit


TurkishEdit

SuffixEdit

-in

  1. Second-person singular possessive suffix denoting singular possession in words ending in a consonant.
    ev - evin
    house - your house
    ofis - ofisin
    office - your office
  2. Genitive case suffix for the nouns which end in a consonant
    öğretmen - öğretmenin
    teacher - teacher's/of the teacher

Usage notesEdit

  • If the noun ends in a vowel, it becomes "-n" (for the possession suffix)
    kedi - kedin
  • It's used only when the word's last vowel is "e" or "i". It may change into "-ün", "-ın" and "-un" according to the last vowel of the word. (possession suffix)
    yüz - yüzün (the last vowel is "ö" or "ü")
    saç - saçın (the last vowel is "a" or "ı")
    yol - yolun (the last vowel is "o" or "u")
  • If the word ends in "p", "ç", "t" or "k", it may change them into "b", "c", "d" and "ğ".
    sebep - sebebin
    köpek - köpeğin
    çekiç - çekicin
    senet - senedin
  • It may cause the last vowel of the word dropped.
    beyin - beynin
  • If the word ends in a vowel, it's used with an auxiliary consonant; "n". (for the genitive case suffix)
    peri - perinin
  • It must be used with an apostrophe if it's appended to a proper noun.
    Canberk - Canberk'in
Last modified on 5 April 2014, at 19:45