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See also: Cras and crás

Contents

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the Proto-Indo-European adverbial root *ḱa-, *ḱu- (to lighten, burn). Compare Ancient Greek καίω (kaíō), Sanskrit श्वस् (śvas) and Persian سو (su, light).

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

crās (not comparable)

  1. tomorrow
    Crās Mārcus lūdōs vidēbit.
    Tomorrow, Marcus will see the games.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

AntonymsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • cras in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • cras in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “cras”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • cras” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to-day the 5th of September; tomorrow September the 5th: hodie qui est dies Non. Sept.; cras qui dies futurus est Non. Sept.

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin crassus.

NounEdit

cras m (oblique plural cras, nominative singular cras, nominative plural cras)

  1. fat (body fat)

DescendantsEdit


Old PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin crās (tomorrow).

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

cras

  1. tomorrow

DescendantsEdit

See alsoEdit


SardinianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin crās.

AdverbEdit

cras

  1. (Logudorese) tomorrow