See also: Hoy, HOY, höy, and høy

English

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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Borrowed from German Heu or Dutch gooi.

 
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Noun

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hoy (plural hoys)

  1. (nautical) A small coaster vessel, usually sloop-rigged, used in conveying passengers and goods, or as a tender to larger vessels in port.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, “Book II, Canto X”, in The Faerie Queene. [], London: [] [John Wolfe] for William Ponsonbie, →OCLC:
      He sent to Germanie, straunge aid to reare, / From whence eftsoones arriued here three hoyes / Of Saxons, whom he for his safetie imployes.
    • July 1779, William Cowper, letter to the Rev. William Unwin
      The hoy went to London every week.
Derived terms
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Translations
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Etymology 2

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Borrowed from Dutch hoi, compare ahoy.

Interjection

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hoy

  1. Ho!, hallo!, stop!
Derived terms
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Verb

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hoy (third-person singular simple present hoys, present participle hoying, simple past and past participle hoyed)

  1. (transitive) To incite; to drive onward.

Etymology 3

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Perhaps related to hoick and hoist.

Verb

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hoy (third-person singular simple present hoys, present participle hoying or hoyin, simple past and past participle hoyed)

  1. (Northumbria, Australia) To throw.
    • 1970 June, traditional (lyrics and music), “The Blackleg Miner” (track 4), in Hark! The Village Wait[1], performed by Steeleye Span:
      They grab his duds and his picks as well. They hoy him down to the pit of hell. Down you go and fare ye well. You dirty blackleg miner.

References

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  • hoy”, in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, Springfield, Mass.: G. & C. Merriam, 1913, →OCLC.
  • Todd's Geordie Words and Phrases, George Todd, Newcastle, 1977[2]
  • Frank Graham (1987) The New Geordie Dictionary, →ISBN
  • Newcastle 1970s, Scott Dobson and Dick Irwin, [3]
  • Northumberland Words, English Dialect Society, R. Oliver Heslop, 1893–4
  • A List of words and phrases in everyday use by the natives of Hetton-le-Hole in the County of Durham, F.M.T.Palgrave, English Dialect Society vol.74, 1896, [4]
  • A Dictionary of North East Dialect, Bill Griffiths, 2005, Northumbria University Press, →ISBN

Anagrams

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Gutnish

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Etymology

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From Old Norse hey, from Proto-Germanic *hawją.

Noun

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hoy n

  1. hay

Derived terms

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Italian

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Etymology

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Unadapted borrowing from English hoy.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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hoy m (invariable)

  1. (nautical) hoy (small coaster vessel)

Scots

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Verb

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hoy (third-person singular simple present hoy, present participle hoyin, simple past hoyed, past participle hoyed)

  1. (Southern Scots) to throw

Spanish

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Etymology

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Inherited from Old Spanish oy, from Latin hodiē. Compare Portuguese hoje.

Pronunciation

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Adverb

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hoy

  1. today
    Synonym: hoy día

Derived terms

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Further reading

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Tagalog

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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Probably a natural expression, as may be inferred from its presence with similar meaning in many other unrelated languages: English hey, Mandarin (āi), Latin eia, and Czech ahoj.

Pronunciation

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Interjection

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hoy (Baybayin spelling ᜑᜓᜌ᜔) (colloquial)

  1. expression used to call the attention of somebody: hey!
    Synonyms: alahoy, (obsolete) ughi, (obsolete) ughoy
    Hoy! Gumising na kayong lahat dyan!
    Hey! Wake up all of you there!
  2. expression used as a warning or as a protest: hey!
    Synonyms: alahoy, (obsolete) ughi, (obsolete) ughoy
    Hoy! Hindi ako ang kumuha ng pera mo!
    Hey! I didn't take your money!

Usage notes

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  • The expression hoy can be perceived as disrespectful in some contexts, especially with one's seniors or superiors. Reactions may be heard such as:
    Huwag mo akong hoy-hoyin!Don't you 'hoy' me!

Derived terms

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See also

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Further reading

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  • hoy”, in Pambansang Diksiyonaryo | Diksiyonaryo.ph, Manila, 2018