EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English dialectal (Northern England/Scotland), deverbal of take in, equivalent to in- +‎ take. More at in-, take.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɪnteɪk/
  • (file)

NounEdit

intake (countable and uncountable, plural intakes)

  1. The place where water, air or other fluid is taken into a pipe or conduit; opposed to outlet.
  2. The beginning of a contraction or narrowing in a tube or cylinder.
  3. The quantity taken in.
    the intake of air
    • 2016, Jayson Lusk, Unnaturally Delicious, →ISBN, page 74:
      In 2010 almost 120,000 people died prematurely and 108 million life years were lost—because of inadequate vitamin A intake.
  4. An act or instance of taking in.
    an intake of oxygen or food
  5. The people taken into an organisation or establishment at a particular time.
    the new intake of students
  6. A tract of land enclosed.
  7. (Britain, dialect) Any kind of cheat or imposition; the act of taking someone in.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

intake (third-person singular simple present intakes, present participle intaking, simple past intook, past participle intaken)

  1. To take in or draw in; to bring in from outside.
    • 1937, Franklin D. Roosevelt, press conference
      Well, I "intook" the general situation west of the Mississippi because I did not get much of a chance to see things east of the Mississippi.
    • 1968, Margaret A. Sherald, NBS Special Publication (issue 540, page 671)
      The particle concentration in the ascending hot current of the combustion product have[sic] been measured by intaking the current into the counter close to the sample plate in the furnace.
    • 2010, John Tyler, Diary of A Dieter (page 258)
      I deduced that if I am intaking the same amount of calories that I always did during Induction, but I am causing my metabolic rate to slow down, it makes sense that the same amount of calories taken in will not burn off as fast as they once did []

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