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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Middle French invitation, from Latin invitatio.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɪn.vɪˈteɪ.ʃən/, /ɪn.vɪˈteɪ.ʃn̩/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪʃən

NounEdit

invitation (countable and uncountable, plural invitations)

  1. The act of inviting; solicitation; the requesting of a person's company.
    an invitation to a party, to a dinner, or to visit a friend
    • 1907, Robert William Chambers, chapter VIII, in The Younger Set (Project Gutenberg; EBook #14852), New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, published 1 February 2005 (Project Gutenberg version), OCLC 24962326:
      At her invitation he outlined for her the succeeding chapters with terse military accuracy ; and what she liked best and best understood was avoidance of that false modesty which condescends, turning technicality into pabulum.
  2. A document or verbal message conveying an invitation.
    We need to print off fifty invitations for the party.
  3. Allurement; enticement.
  4. (fencing) A line that is intentionally left open to encourage the opponent to attack.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin invitatio, invitationem.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

invitation f (plural invitations)

  1. invitation

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


InterlinguaEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

invitation (plural invitationes)

  1. invitation