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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the Middle English Gene (Genoa), from the Old French Jannes. Bleu de Gênes (Genovese blue) was a blue dye made in Genoa used to tint the denim cloth produced in Nîmes (de Nîmes).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

jean (countable and uncountable, plural jeans)

  1. (chiefly attributive) Denim.
    She wore a tattered jean jacket.

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English jean.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

jean m (plural jeans)

  1. a pair of jeans

Further readingEdit


ManxEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /d͡ʒɪn/, /d͡ʒen/

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish ·dénai, prototonic form of do·gní.

The past form ren is from Old Irish do·rigni, deuterotonic form of the perfect tense of do·gní.

VerbEdit

jean (past ren, future independent nee, verbal noun jannoo, past participle jeant)

  1. (auxiliary) A syntactic marker that carries the tense of the verb, replacing its synthetic form; the true verb follows as a verbal noun.
    Ren (replaces hie) eh goll thie.He went home.
    Yinnagh (replaces ragh) eh goll thie.He would go home.
    Nee (replaces hed) eh goll thie.He will go home.
    Jean (replaces gow) goll thie.Go home.
  2. do, make

ConjugationEdit


SpanishEdit

NounEdit

jean m (plural jeans)

  1. jeans