Open main menu
See also: jilț

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Contracted from Scots jillet (a giddy girl, a jill-flirt).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /dʒɪlt/
  • (file)
    Rhymes: -ɪlt

NounEdit

jilt (plural jilts)

  1. A woman who jilts a lover.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Otway to this entry?)

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

jilt (third-person singular simple present jilts, present participle jilting, simple past and past participle jilted)

  1. (transitive) To cast off capriciously or unfeelingly, as a lover; to deceive in love.
    • (Can we date this quote?) John Locke
      Tell a man passionately in love, that he is jilted; bring a score of witnesses of the falsehood of his mistress, it is ten to one but three kind words of hers shall invalidate all their testimonies.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 8, in The Celebrity:
      The humor of my proposition appealed more strongly to Miss Trevor than I had looked for, and from that time forward she became her old self again; for, even after she had conquered her love for the Celebrity, the mortification of having been jilted by him remained.

TranslationsEdit


TurkmenEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Arabic جِلْد (jild, skin, hide).

NounEdit

jilt (definite accusative ?, plural ?)

  1. skin