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See also: Leek

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EnglishEdit

 
Three leeks

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English leke, leek, lek, from Old English lēac (a garden herb, leek, onion, garlic), from Proto-Germanic *lauką *laukaz (leek, onion), from Proto-Indo-European *lewg- (to bend). Cognate with Dutch look (garlic, leek), Low German look, Look, German Lauch (leek, allium), Danish løg (onion), Swedish lök (onion), Icelandic laukur (onion, leek, garlic). See garlic.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

leek (plural leeks)

  1. The vegetable Allium ampeloprasum, of the lily family, having edible leaves and an onion-like bulb but with a milder flavour than the onion.
  2. Any of several species of Allium, broadly resembling the domesticated plant in appearance in the wild.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • Rhymes: -eːk
  • IPA(key): /leːk/
    • (file)

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin lāicus (layman, laic), from Ancient Greek λαϊκός (laïkós, of the people), from λαός (laós, the people).

NounEdit

leek m (plural leken, diminutive leekje n)

  1. layman, non-clergyman
  2. layman, non-expert, amateur
AntonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

leek (comparative leker, superlative leekst)

  1. (obsolete) lay, worldly, secular, profane
InflectionEdit
Inflection of leek
uninflected leek
inflected leke
comparative leker
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial leek leker het leekst
het leekste
indefinite m./f. sing. leke lekere leekste
n. sing. leek leker leekste
plural leke lekere leekste
definite leke lekere leekste
partitive leeks lekers

Etymology 2Edit

Cognate with laak, Latin lacus, English lake.

NounEdit

leek ? (plural leken, diminutive leekje n)

  1. small body of water, like a pool; gave rise to place names

Etymology 3Edit

Unknown; local dialect in the Dutch region Betuwe.

NounEdit

leek ? (plural leken, diminutive leekje n)

  1. (botany) the plant Rumex crispus
  2. (by extension) related plants of that genus: sorrel, dock
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

VerbEdit

leek

  1. singular past indicative of lijken

VerbEdit

leek

  1. first-person singular present indicative of leken
  2. imperative of leken

AnagramsEdit


EstonianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Finnic [Term?], cognate to Finnish liekki and Karelian liekki. Possibly the same root as in Votic lõõkkua (to move, to sway) and Finnish liekkua.

NounEdit

leek (genitive leegi, partitive leeki)

  1. blaze, flame, fire
    Mu korter on leekides.
    My apartment is up in flames.

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

leek

  1. Alternative form of leke