EnglishEdit

NounEdit

leag (plural leags)

  1. Archaic spelling of league.
    • 1989, Harry W. Duckworth, The English River Book: A North West Company Journal and Account Book of 1786[1], McGill-Queens, →ISBN, page 19:
      I found the hand & three others Indians the rest of the Canoes Camped 2 leags Below
    • 2000, Harry S. Burrage, Gorges and the Grant of the Province of Maine 1622[2], Heritage Books, →ISBN, page 81:
      … from the Illand of flowers beinge ten Leags South weste from ytt.
    • 2006, Joseph E. Garland, The Fish and the Falcon[3], The History Press, →ISBN, page 156:
      … E [by] S distant six Leags.

AnagramsEdit


IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Irish lecaid, from Old Norse leggja.

VerbEdit

leag (present analytic leagann, future analytic leagfaidh, verbal noun leagan, past participle leagtha) (transitive, intransitive)

  1. knock down
  2. lower
  3. lay, set
  4. (knitting) cast off (stitch)
  5. (card games) play
ConjugationEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

leag f (genitive singular leige, nominative plural leaga)

  1. Alternative form of leac
DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit