GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈlɛkŋ̩/, /ˈlɛkən/

Etymology 1Edit

From Old High German lecchōn, from Proto-Germanic *likkōną, Proto-Indo-European *leyǵʰ-. Cognate with Dutch likken, English lick, Latin lingo, Ancient Greek λείχω (leíkhō).

VerbEdit

lecken (third-person singular simple present leckt, past tense leckte, past participle geleckt, auxiliary haben)

  1. (transitive or intransitive, also with an + dative) to lick (strike with the tongue)
    Der Hund leckte sein Fell.The dog licked its fur.
    Der Hund leckte an seinem Fell.The dog licked its fur.
  2. (transitive or intransitive) to lick (perform cunnilingus)
    Mein Freund leckt total gerne.
    My boyfriend totally enjoys licking.
ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle Low German lecken, from Old Saxon *lekkian, from Proto-Germanic *lakjaną, originally a causative of the verb Proto-Germanic *lekaną (to leak), related to English leak. The same in Dutch lekken (to leak).

VerbEdit

lecken (third-person singular simple present leckt, past tense leckte, past participle geleckt, auxiliary haben)

  1. to leak (a liquid, such as water)
  2. to seep
ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit


Middle DutchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Dutch leccon, from Proto-West Germanic *likkōn, from Proto-Germanic *likkōną.

VerbEdit

lecken

  1. to lick
InflectionEdit

This verb needs an inflection-table template.

Alternative formsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Dutch: likken
  • Limburgish: lekke

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Dutch *lekken, from Proto-Germanic *lakjaną.

VerbEdit

lecken

  1. Synonym of lēken
InflectionEdit

This verb needs an inflection-table template.

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit