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InterlinguaEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin leo

NounEdit

leon

  1. a lion
  2. Leo

IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

 
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leon

From Old Irish léoman, léo, from Latin leō.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

leon m (genitive singular leoin, nominative plural leoin)

  1. lion
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Irish leónaid, a late form of lénaid (impairs, injures, wounds), from lén (defeat, hurt, injury, misfortune, sorrow).

VerbEdit

leon (present analytic leonann, future analytic leonfaidh, verbal noun leonadh, past participle leonta)

  1. (transitive) sprain
  2. (transitive) injure, wound
ConjugationEdit

ReferencesEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

leon (plural leons)

  1. Alternative form of lyoun

OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin leō, leōnis.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

leon m (plural leons)

  1. lion

Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *līhwaną. Cognate with Old High German lihan (German leihen).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

lēon

  1. to lend, loan

ConjugationEdit


Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

leon m (oblique plural leons, nominative singular leons, nominative plural leon)

  1. Alternative form of lion

Old SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin leōnem, accusative of leō, from Ancient Greek λέων (léōn).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

leon m (plural leones)

  1. lion
    • c. 1250: Alfonso X, Lapidario, f. 6v.
      Et por ende a tal ṕpriedat eſta piedra q́ el q́ la trae obedecé le los leones aſſi q́ los puede tomar a manos ¬ nol fará mal por q́ el leó q́ndo la uee pierde toda la fuerça ¬ nó a en ſi poder.
      And such is the property of this stone that lions will obey he who bears it, so that he can touch them with his hands and they will not harm him, for when he sees it the lion loses all its strength and has in him no power.

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Spanish: león
    • Guaraní: leõ
    • Kapampangan: leon
    • Quechua: liyun

PapiamentuEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Spanish león and Kabuverdianu lion.

NounEdit

leon

  1. lion

VenetianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin leō, leōnem (compare Italian leone).

NounEdit

leon m (plural leoni) or leon m (plural leuni)

  1. lion

VolapükEdit

NounEdit

leon (nominative plural leons)

  1. (male or female) lion

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit