See also: Leo, LEO, Léo, lẹo, -leo, and Lêô

English edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

leo (plural leos)

  1. (informal) Abbreviation of leotard.
    • 2011, Jennifer Kronenberg, So, You Want To Be a Ballet Dancer?:
      To this day, I still try to steer clear of wearing a black leo and pink tights together []
    • 2016, Shawn Johnson, The Flip Side, page 66:
      Now go grab your favorite leotard and makeup bag. I'll run you over there.” [] I rush to apply eye makeup that also matches my leo.

Translations edit

Anagrams edit

Galician edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

leo

  1. first-person singular present indicative of ler
  2. first-person singular present indicative of lear

Hawaiian edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Polynesian *leo, from Proto-Oceanic *leqo, from Proto-Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *liqə, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *liqəʀ, from Proto-Austronesian *liqəʀ (neck). Compare also Tetum lian.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

leo

  1. voice; sound
  2. command
    I aliʻi nō ʻoe, i kanaka au, malalo aku au o kō leo. (Hula song)
    You be the chief, I the servant, I shall be obedient to your command.
  3. verbal message

Verb edit

leo

  1. to speak
  2. to make a sound

Derived terms edit

References edit

  • Pukui, Mary Kawena; Elbert (1986), “leo”, in Hawaiian Dictionary, Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press

Helong edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *liqə, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *liqəʀ, from Proto-Austronesian *liqəʀ.

Noun edit

leo

  1. neck

Irish edit

Etymology 1 edit

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

leo (emphatic leosan)

  1. third-person plural of le: with them, to them

Etymology 2 edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

leo m (genitive singular leo, nominative plural leonna)

  1. slush, slime, slick
Declension edit
Derived terms edit

References edit

  1. ^ Finck, F. N. (1899) Die araner mundart (in German), volume I, Marburg: Elwert’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, page 196
  2. ^ de Bhaldraithe, Tomás (1977) Gaeilge Chois Fhairrge: An Deilbhíocht (in Irish), 2nd edition, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, § 308

Latin edit

 
Latin Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia la
 
leō (a lion)

Etymology edit

From Ancient Greek λέων (léōn).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

leō m (genitive leōnis); third declension

  1. lion
  2. lion's skin
  3. (astronomy) the constellation Leo
  4. (figuratively) lionheart; a courageous person
  5. a kind of crab
  6. a kind of plant

Declension edit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative leō leōnēs
Genitive leōnis leōnum
Dative leōnī leōnibus
Accusative leōnem leōnēs
Ablative leōne leōnibus
Vocative leō leōnēs

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

See also edit

References edit

  • leo”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • leo”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • leo in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • leo in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • leo”, in The Perseus Project (1999) Perseus Encyclopedia[1]
  • leo”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • leo”, in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray

Niuean edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Polynesian *leo.

Noun edit

leo

  1. voice, sound

Old English edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-West Germanic *lēwō.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

lēo f or m

  1. lion
    Eom iċ lēo ġif iċ menn ete?
    Am I a lion if I eat people?

Declension edit

Pukapukan edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Polynesian *leo.

Noun edit

leo

  1. voice

Samoan edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Polynesian *leo.

Noun edit

leo

  1. voice, sound

Sikaiana edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Polynesian *leo.

Noun edit

leo

  1. voice, sound of a voice
  2. pronunciation
  3. tune (of a song)

Spanish edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈleo/ [ˈle.o]
  • Audio (Colombia):(file)
  • Rhymes: -eo
  • Syllabification: le‧o

Etymology 1 edit

Adjective edit

leo m or f (masculine and feminine plural leos)

  1. Leo

Noun edit

leo m or f by sense (plural leos)

  1. Leo

Etymology 2 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb edit

leo

  1. first-person singular present indicative of leer

Further reading edit

Swahili edit

Etymology edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation edit

Adverb edit

leo

  1. today

Tokelauan edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Polynesian *leo. Cognates include Hawaiian leo and Maori reo.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): [ˈle.o]
  • Hyphenation: le‧o

Noun edit

leo

  1. voice
  2. talk
  3. noise, sound

References edit

  • R. Simona, editor (1986) Tokelau Dictionary[2], Auckland: Office of Tokelau Affairs, page 182

Tuvaluan edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Polynesian *leo.

Noun edit

leo

  1. voice, sound

Vietnamese edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Vietic *g-lɛːw, whence also trèo.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

leo (, , 𨇉)

  1. to climb
    leo câyto climb a tree
    leo núito go mountain climbing or hiking

See also edit

Derived terms