Open main menu
See also: Leo, LEO, Léo, lẹo, le'o, -leo, and Lêô

Contents

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

leo (plural leos)

  1. (informal) Abbreviation of leotard.
    • 2011, Jennifer Kronenberg, So, You Want To Be a Ballet Dancer?
      To this day, I still try to steer clear of wearing a black leo and pink tights together []
    • 2016, Shawn Johnson, The Flip Side (page 66)
      Now go grab your favorite leotard and makeup bag. I'll run you over there.” [] I rush to apply eye makeup that also matches my leo.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


GalicianEdit

HawaiianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Polynesian [Term?].

NounEdit

leo

  1. voice

IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

leo (emphatic leosan)

  1. third-person plural of le: with them, to them

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Finck, F. N. (1899), Die araner mundart, Marburg: Elwert’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, vol. I, p. 196.
  2. ^ Tomás de Bhaldraithe, 1977, Gaeilge Chois Fhairrge: An Deilbhíocht, 2nd edition, Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, section 308.

LatinEdit

 
Latin Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia la
 
leō (a lion)

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek λέων (léōn)

PronunciationEdit

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈle.oː/, [ˈɫe.oː]
  • (file)

NounEdit

leō m (genitive leōnis); third declension

  1. lion
  2. lion's skin
  3. (astronomy) the constellation Leo
  4. (figuratively) lionheart; a courageous person
  5. a kind of crab
  6. a kind of plant

DeclensionEdit

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative leō leōnēs
Genitive leōnis leōnum
Dative leōnī leōnibus
Accusative leōnem leōnēs
Ablative leōne leōnibus
Vocative leō leōnēs

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • leo in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • leo in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • leo in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • leo in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • leo in The Perseus Project (1999) Perseus Encyclopedia[1]
  • leo in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • leo in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray

Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin leō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lēo f or m

  1. lion
    Eom iċ lēo ġif iċ menn ete?
    Am I a lion if I eat people?
DeclensionEdit

SikaianaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Polynesian [Term?].

NounEdit

leo

  1. voice, sound of a voice
  2. pronunciation
  3. tune (of a song)

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

leo

  1. First-person singular (yo) present indicative form of leer.

SwahiliEdit

AdverbEdit

leo

  1. today

VietnameseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Vietic *g-lɛːw; cognate with trèo.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

leo (, , 𨇉)

  1. to climb

Derived termsEdit

Derived terms

See alsoEdit