leonine

See also: léonine

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈliːənaɪ̯n/
    • (file)

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin leōnīnus (lion-like); leo +‎ -ine.

Alternative formsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

leonine (comparative more leonine, superlative most leonine)

  1. Of, pertaining to, or characteristic of a lion.
    His leonine face scared the young children.
    • 1887, Thomas Adolphus Trollope, What I Remember, Volume 2, chapter XIV (ebook):
      He [Landor] was a man of somewhat leonine aspect as regards the general appearance and expression of the head and face, which accorded well with the large and massive build of the figure, and to which a superbly curling white beard added not only picturesqueness, but a certain nobility.
    • 2005, Sean Dooley, The Big Twitch, Sydney: Allen and Unwin, page 124:
      He is the birdwatching equivalent of a great hunter, striding along the edge of the swamp with an almost leonine confidence, his large hands gripping his binoculars like a gunslinger wields a Colt 45.
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

leonine (plural leonines)

  1. (numismatics, historical) A 13th-century coin minted in Europe and used in England as a debased form of the sterling silver penny, outlawed under Edward I.

Etymology 2Edit

Perhaps from Leoninus, a 12th-century canon in Paris, or from Pope Leo II.

NounEdit

leonine (plural leonines)

  1. (poetry) A kind of Latin verse, generally alternate hexameter and pentameter, rhyming at the middle and end.

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

leonine

  1. feminine plural of leonino

LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

leōnīne

  1. vocative masculine singular of leōnīnus