See also: Manso

ChavacanoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Spanish manso (tame).

AdjectiveEdit

manso

  1. meek; tame

GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese manso, from Vulgar Latin *mansus, from Latin mansuetus.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

manso m (feminine singular mansa, masculine plural mansos, feminine plural mansas)

  1. (of animals) tame (mild and well-behaved)
    Antonym: bravo
  2. (of plants) grafted; cultured
    Antonym: bravo
  3. (of people) meek; gentle
    Antonym: bravo
  4. (of nature and natural phenomena) mild; gentle

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • manso” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • manso” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • manso” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • manso” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • manso” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈman.so/
  • Rhymes: -anso
  • Hyphenation: màn‧so

Etymology 1Edit

From Vulgar Latin *mānsus, back-formed from Latin mānsuētus.

AdjectiveEdit

manso (feminine mansa, masculine plural mansi, feminine plural manse)

  1. (literary, regional) meek, tame
    • 1321, Dante Alighieri, La divina commedia: Purgatorio [The Divine Comedy: Purgatory] (paperback), Bompiani, published 2001, Canto XXVIII, lines 76–78, page 416:
      Quali si stanno ruminando manse ¶ le capre, state rapide e proterve ¶ sovra le cime avante che sien pranse
      Even as in ruminating passive grow the goats, who have been swift and venturesome upon the mountain-tops ere they were fed
    Synonyms: docile, mansueto
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Medieval Latin mānsum (residence), from Latin mānsus, perfect passive participle of maneō (I stay, remain).

NounEdit

manso m (plural mansi)

  1. (historical) an amount of land (usually 12 jugerums) considered cultivable yearly by using two oxen or a single plough

LatinEdit

ParticipleEdit

mānsō

  1. dative masculine singular of mānsus
  2. dative neuter singular of mānsus
  3. ablative masculine singular of mānsus
  4. ablative neuter singular of mānsus

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *mansus, from Latin mansuetus.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈmɐ̃.su/, [ˈmɐ̃.su]

  • Hyphenation: man‧so
  • Rhymes: -ɐ̃su

AdjectiveEdit

manso m (feminine singular mansa, masculine plural mansos, feminine plural mansas, comparable)

  1. (of animals) tame (mild and well-behaved)
  2. (of people) meek; submissive (following orders without protest)
  3. (of nature and natural phenomena) mild; gentle; tranquil

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • manso” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.

SpanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Vulgar Latin *mansus, from Latin mansuetus.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈmanso/, [ˈmãn.so]

AdjectiveEdit

manso (feminine mansa, masculine plural mansos, feminine plural mansas)

  1. tame, meek; not threatening
    Antonyms: bravo, amenazante, agresivo, peligroso, perrucho
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Possibly an alteration of inmenso.

AdjectiveEdit

manso (feminine mansa, masculine plural mansos, feminine plural mansas)

  1. (colloquial, intensifier, Chile) gigantic, big
Usage notesEdit

Used in exclamatory phrases, precedes the modified noun, sometimes it's itself preceded by an article, but it's not required.

Further readingEdit