mayonnaise

See also: Mayonnaise

EnglishEdit

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from French mayonnaise, named after the city Mahón whence the recipe was brought back to France.

The United States standard of identity comes from 21 CFR 169.140.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈmeɪ.ə.neɪz/, /ˌmeɪ.əˈneɪz/
  • also (General American) IPA(key): /ˈmæn.eɪz/, [ˈmeən.eɪz]
  • Rhymes: -eɪz
  • The General American pronunciation IPA(key): /ˈmæn.eɪz/, [ˈmeən.eɪz] pronunciation is because of æ-tensing. In many cases, the vowel has not actually flattened, but æ-tensing has caused many /æ/ vowels (including in mayonnaise) to tense to the phoneme [eə]. Sometimes this vowel is pronounced as a true [æ] anyway, because speakers interpret the -ayo- in mayonnaise as the /æ/ phoneme due to conventional allophony. See also graham, where æ-tensing has a similar effect.

NounEdit

mayonnaise (uncountable)

  1. A dressing made from vegetable oil, raw egg yolks and seasoning, used on salads and in sandwiches.
    1. (US standard of identity) An edible emulsified semisolid made of: vegetable oil (at least 65%); vinegar and/or lemon juice; raw egg (whole eggs or yolks); and, optionally, any of various flavor-related ingredients, sequestrants, acids, and crystallization inhibitors.
    • 1985 May, Boys' Life, volume 75, page 20: 
      There are 250 foods, including mayonnaise, cheese and cocoa, that don't list ingredients at all.
      1985, Irma S. Rombauer, Marion Rombauer Becker, Joy, page 7:
      The FDA's original intent for foods included under "standards of identity" ensured that terms like "mayonnaise" or "ice cream” would guarantee the same basic ingredients required in the government-established recipe no matter who manufactured it.
      1993, Eve Johnson, Title=Five Star Food:
      I grew up thinking that the blue and white Miracle Whip salad dressing jar in the fridge held the same substance the rest of the world knew as mayonnaise. / Now I know that mayonnaise is something entirely different.
      2008, Jan McCracken, The Everything Lactose Free Cookbook:
      The oils in store-bought mayonnaise range from olive oil to sunflower oil to safflower oil and some less desirable oils!
      2012, Marie A. Boyle, Sara Long Roth, Personal Nutrition:
      Most store-bought mayonnaise contains ingredients (vinegar, lemonjuice, and salt) that actually slow bacterial growth

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


DanishEdit

Danish Wikipedia has articles on:

Wikipedia daWikipedia da

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French mayonnaise.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /majonɛːsə/, [mɑjoˈnɛːsə]

NounEdit

mayonnaise c (singular definite mayonnaisen, plural indefinite mayonnaiser)

  1. mayonnaise

InflectionEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mayonnaise f (plural mayonnaises)

  1. mayonnaise

DescendantsEdit

Last modified on 31 March 2014, at 00:35