See also: Mok

AwarEdit

NounEdit

mok

  1. water

Further readingEdit


DutchEdit

 
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PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /mɔk/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɔk

Etymology 1Edit

Probably related to Old Dutch *mocha (piece, lump), from Proto-Germanic *mukkan- (bump, lump), perhaps ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *muk- (heap), similar to Ancient Greek μύκων (múkōn, pile). Compare Old English mūga, Old Norse múgr (mass, heap (of corn)).[1][2]

NounEdit

mok f or m (plural mokken, diminutive mokje n)

  1. mug, large cup with handle
DescendantsEdit
  • Berbice Creole Dutch: moku
  • Skepi Creole Dutch: mok

Etymology 2Edit

17th century, alternative form of muik, from Middle Dutch muyck, from Proto-West Germanic *mūk-, (*mukk-). Cognate with German Mauke, which see.

NounEdit

mok f (uncountable)

  1. mud fever (infection of a horse’s lower limb)

Etymology 3Edit

See the lemma.

VerbEdit

mok

  1. first-person singular present indicative of mokken
  2. imperative of mokken

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Pokorny, Julius (1959) Indogermanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch [Indo-European Etymological Dictionary] (in German), volume 2, Bern, München: Francke Verlag, page 752
  2. ^ van der Sijs, Nicoline, editor (2010), “mok1”, in Etymologiebank, Meertens Institute

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

mok

  1. Alternative form of muk

ZhuangEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Tai *ʰmoːkᴰ (fog), from Old Chinese (OC *moɡs, “fog; mist”).[1] Cognate with Thai หมอก (mɔ̀ɔk), Lao ໝອກ (mǭk), ᦖᦸᧅᧈ (ṁoak1), Shan မွၵ်ႇ (màuk), Ahom 𑜉𑜨𑜀𑜫 (mok), Nong Zhuang moag or mog, Saek ม̄อก.

NounEdit

mok (old orthography mok)

  1. fog
    Synonyms: (dialectal) mojlox, (dialectal) mouh
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

mok (old orthography mok)

  1. white liquid in unripe grain; juice
  2. swill; slops
    Synonyms: samj, (dialectal) saemj

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Pittayaporn, Pittayawat (2014), “Layers of Chinese Loanwords in Proto-Southwestern Tai as Evidence for the Dating of the Spread of Southwestern Tai”, in MANUSYA: Journal of Humanities, volume 20 (special issue), Bangkok: Chulalongkorn University, ISSN 0859-9920, pages 47–68.