swill

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

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PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

swill (plural swills)

  1. a mixture of solid and liquid food scraps fed to pigs etc; especially kitchen waste for this purpose
  2. any disgusting or distasteful liquid
    I cannot believe anyone could drink this swill.
  3. anything disgusting or worthless
    This new TV show is a worthless load of swill.
  4. a large quantity of liquid drunk at one swallow
    He took a swill of his drink and tried to think of words.
  5. (Ultimate Frisbee) A badly-thrown pass
  6. Inexpensive beer

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

swill (third-person singular simple present swills, present participle swilling, simple past and past participle swilled)

  1. to eat or drink greedily or to excess
    • Smollett
      Well-dressed people, of both sexes, [] devouring sliced beef, and swilling pork, and punch, and cider.
    • 1913, D.H. Lawrence, Sons and Lovers, chapter 8
      If you can give me no more than twenty-five shillings, I'm sure I'm not going to buy you pork-pie to stuff, after you've swilled a bellyful of beer.
  2. to wash something by flooding with water
    • Shakespeare
      As fearfully as doth a galled rock / O'erhang and jutty his confounded base, / Swilled with the wild and wasteful ocean.
  3. to inebriate; to fill with drink.
    • Milton
      I should be loth / To meet the rudeness and swilled insolence / Of such late wassailers.
  4. to feed pigs swill
    • 1921, Nephi Anderson, Dorian Chapter 8
      "Carlia, have you swilled the pigs?"

AnagramsEdit

Last modified on 18 April 2014, at 01:57