See also: Molly

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Molly, the personal name, a pet form of Mary. In some cases it is possibly derived from mollitia (softness, weakness). Drug sense probably influenced by the initial of MDMA.[1]

NounEdit

molly (countable and uncountable, plural mollies)

  1. (now chiefly Ireland) A woman or girl, especially of low status.
  2. (slang) An effeminate male, a male homosexual.
  3. (slang, uncountable) Pure MDMA powder.
    Synonym: mandy
    • 2013, “We Can’t Stop”, in Bangerz, performed by Miley Cyrus:
      So la-da-di-da-di, we like to party / Dancing with Molly / Doing whatever we want
  4. A mollemoke.
  5. A female cat, a she-cat (usually spayed)
  6. A bird, the wagtail.
  7. A molly bolt.
Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

molly (third-person singular simple present mollies, present participle mollying, simple past and past participle mollied)

  1. To engage in (male) homosexual activity with.
    • 1998, Netta Murray Goldsmith, The Worst of Crimes, page 79:
      I said, "I never mollied you." My Lord, I never laid Hands upon him, nor touch'd him.
    • 2007, Matt Cook, A Gay History of Britain:
      On one occasion, Partridge was nearly mobbed in a molly-house when some men called him a 'treacherous, blowing-up, mollying bitch, and swore they'd massacre anybody that should betray them.'
    • 2017, Peter Ackroyd, Queer City: Gay London from the Romans to the Present Day:
      It is a case of the biter bit, or the molly-taker mollied, but it is also an interesting example of the ways in which the criminal underworld and sexual underworld met in eighteenth-century London

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Mollienesia, an invalid taxonomic name for the genus, influenced by the personal name Molly.

NounEdit

molly (plural mollies)

  1. A fish of the genus Poecilia, except for those known as guppies.
TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

molly (plural mollies)

  1. (India, South Asia) Alternative spelling of mali (a member of a caste in South Asia whose traditional occupation is gardening; hence, any South Asian gardener).

ReferencesEdit