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See also: Moll and møll

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Moll, an archaic nickname for Mary (see also Molly).

Alternative formsEdit

  • mole (Australian, girlfriend of surfie or bikie)

PronunciationEdit

  • Rhymes: -ɒl
  • (file)

NounEdit

moll (plural molls)

  1. A female companion of a gangster, especially a former or current prostitute.
  2. A prostitute or woman with loose sexual morals.
  3. (Australia, New Zealand, slang, derogatory) Bitch, slut; an insulting epithet applied to a female.
  4. (Australia, New Zealand, slang) A girlfriend of a bikie.
    • 1979, Eric Reade, History and Heartburn: The Saga of Australian Film, 1896-1978, p.209:
      The bikies ‘molls’ included Susan Lloyd as Tart; Victoria Anoux as Flossie; and Rosalind Talamini as Sunshine.
    • 1995, Debra Adelaide, The Hotel Albatross, p.76:
      ‘Oh God!’ groans Julie who once was a bikie moll back in the early seventies. ‘Hope it′s no one I know.’ But the Machismos turn out to be based on a New Zealand gang, which assembled in Australia after her time.
    • 2009, Albert Moran, Errol Vieth, The A to Z of Australian and New Zealand Cinema, p.142:
      Gilling first appeared as the biker′s moll Vanessa in Stone (1974) and the beautiful, evil cabin attendant in Number 96 (1974).
  5. (Australia, New Zealand, slang) A girlfriend of a surfie; blends with pejorative sense.
Usage notesEdit

(girlfriend of a surfie or bikie): Because Australian pronunciation merges the /ɒ/ and /əʊ/ phonemes before /l/ (both become [oʊl]), this word is very commonly spelt mole in Australia, probably by contamination with mole (sneaky person). Indeed, the Australian Oxford dictionary does not list the Australian meaning of the term under the headword moll, but only under mole, although it does recognise that mole in this sense is “probably” a mere “variant of moll”.

SynonymsEdit
  • (surfie's girlfriend): chick

Etymology 2Edit

German Moll, from Latin mollis (soft, tender, elegiac). Compare molle (flat (in music)).

AdjectiveEdit

moll (not comparable)

  1. (music, obsolete) minor; in the minor mode
    A moll, that is, A minor

TranslationsEdit

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for moll in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Occitan (compare Occitan mòl), from Latin mollis, mollem (compare French mou, Spanish muelle), from earlier *molduis, from Proto-Indo-European *(h₂)moldus (soft, weak), from *mel- (soft, weak, tender).

AdjectiveEdit

moll (feminine molla, masculine plural molls, feminine plural molles)

  1. moist
  2. weak
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Occitan [Term?], from Vulgar Latin *medullum (compare Occitan mesolh, Spanish meollo, Portuguese miolo, Italian midollo), from Latin medulla[1], and probably influenced by Etymology 1. Doublet of the borrowing medul·la.

NounEdit

moll m (uncountable)

  1. marrow, as in bone marrow
  2. the soft part of a fruit

Etymology 3Edit

From Latin mullus (red mullet).

NounEdit

moll m (plural molls)

  1. several species of fish
    moll de fangMullus barbatus
    moll de rocaMullus surmuletus
    moll reialApogon imberbis

Etymology 4Edit

From Latin moles.

NounEdit

moll m (plural molls)

  1. quay, jetty
  2. breakwater

Further readingEdit

ReferencesEdit


HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from German Moll, from Latin mollis (soft).[1]

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈmolː]
  • Hyphenation: moll

AdjectiveEdit

moll (not comparable)

  1. (music) minor
    moll akkordminor chord

DeclensionEdit

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative moll mollok
accusative mollt mollokat
dative mollnak molloknak
instrumental mollal mollokkal
causal-final mollért mollokért
translative mollá mollokká
terminative mollig mollokig
essive-formal mollként mollokként
essive-modal
inessive mollban mollokban
superessive mollon mollokon
adessive mollnál molloknál
illative mollba mollokba
sublative mollra mollokra
allative mollhoz mollokhoz
elative mollból mollokból
delative mollról mollokról
ablative molltól molloktól

NounEdit

moll (plural mollok)

  1. (music) minor (scale or key)
    D-mollD minor

DeclensionEdit

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative moll mollok
accusative mollt mollokat
dative mollnak molloknak
instrumental mollal mollokkal
causal-final mollért mollokért
translative mollá mollokká
terminative mollig mollokig
essive-formal mollként mollokként
essive-modal
inessive mollban mollokban
superessive mollon mollokon
adessive mollnál molloknál
illative mollba mollokba
sublative mollra mollokra
allative mollhoz mollokhoz
elative mollból mollokból
delative mollról mollokról
ablative molltól molloktól
Possessive forms of moll
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. mollom molljaim
2nd person sing. mollod molljaid
3rd person sing. mollja molljai
1st person plural mollunk molljaink
2nd person plural mollotok molljaitok
3rd person plural molljuk molljaik

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ moll in Tótfalusi, István. Magyar etimológiai nagyszótár (’Hungarian Comprehensive Dictionary of Etymology’). Budapest: Arcanum Adatbázis, 2001; Arcanum DVD Könyvtár →ISBN

Further readingEdit

  • moll in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh: A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962.

IcelandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mollis (soft, mild).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

moll m (genitive singular molls, nominative plural mollar)

  1. (music) minor (scale or key)

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit


IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish moil (a mass, heap, pile), mul m (a globular mass, heap, lump).

NounEdit

moll m (genitive singular moill, nominative plural mollta)

  1. heap; large amount, large number

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
moll mholl not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit


ManxEdit

Etymology 1Edit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

VerbEdit

moll (past voll, future independent mollee, verbal noun molley, past participle mollit)

  1. fool, baffle, foil, beguile, cajole, captivate, deceive, bluff, trick
    • Mollee y molteyr oo my oddys eh.The deceiver will deceive you if he can.
  2. disappoint
    • V'eh mollit nagh daink ee.He was disappointed that she did not come.
  3. impose
  4. be mistaken
    • Ayns shen t'ou mollit.That is where you are mistaken.

Derived termsEdit

  • molteyr (deceiver, charlatan, duper, fraud, cheat, con man, impostor)

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Irish moil (a mass, heap, pile), mul m (a globular mass, heap, lump).

NounEdit

moll m (genitive singular moll)

  1. mass, pile, heap, pack
  2. cluster, gathering, collection, huddle
  3. nave

MutationEdit

Manx mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
moll voll unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

EtymologyEdit

From German Moll, from Latin mollis.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

moll m (definite singular mollen, uncountable)

  1. (music) minor (scale or key)

AntonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit


SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

moll (indeclinable)

  1. (music) minor scale

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit