See also: näit, naît, and NAIT

Contents

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English naiten, nayten, from Old Norse neita, later variant of Old Norse níta ‎(to deny, refuse), from Proto-Germanic *niitjaną ‎(to say 'no', deny, refuse), from Proto-Germanic *ne ‎(no, not). Cognate with Icelandic neita ‎(to deny), Danish nægte ‎(to deny), Old English nǣtan ‎(to annoy, afflict, press upon, trample upon, crush, subdue, injure, destroy). More at nyte, nay.

VerbEdit

nait ‎(third-person singular simple present naits, present participle naiting, simple past and past participle naited)

  1. (transitive) To refuse; deny; disclaim.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English naiten, nayten, from Old Norse neyta ‎(to use, employ), from Proto-Germanic *nautijaną ‎(to use), from Proto-Indo-European *newd- ‎(to acquire, make use of). Cognate with Icelandic neyta ‎(to make use of, employ). Related also to Icelandic nýta ‎(to use, make use of), Old English nēotan ‎(to use, make use of, have the use of, have the benefit of, enjoy, employ). More at note.

VerbEdit

nait ‎(third-person singular simple present naits, present participle naiting, simple past and past participle naited)

  1. (transitive) To use; employ.
  2. (transitive) To go over; recite; repeat.
  3. (reflexive) To exert oneself.

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English naite, from Old Norse neyte, neyti ‎(use), from Proto-Germanic *nautiz ‎(use).

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

nait ‎(plural naits)

  1. (Britain dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) Use; profit; foredeal; advantage.
  2. (Britain dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) Use; end; purpose.

Etymology 4Edit

From Middle English nait, nayt, from Old Norse neytr ‎(in good order, fit, fit for use), from Proto-Germanic *nautiz ‎(useful, helpful). Compare Old English nyttol ‎(useful).

AdjectiveEdit

nait ‎(comparative naiter or more nait, superlative naitest or most nait)

  1. (Britain dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) Useful; good at need; fit; able.
  2. (Britain dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) Quick and effective; deft; skilful.
  3. (Britain dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) In good order; trim; tidy; dainty; clean.
Derived termsEdit

FinnishEdit

VerbEdit

nait

  1. Second-person singular indicative present form of naida.
  2. Second-person singular indicative past form of naida.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

nait

  1. third-person singular present indicative of naitre

AnagramsEdit


Tok PisinEdit

EtymologyEdit

English night

NounEdit

nait

  1. night
    • 1989, Buk Baibel long Tok Pisin, Bible Society of Papua New Guinea, Genesis 1:5 (translation here):
      Tulait em i kolim “De,” na tudak em i kolim “Nait.” Nait i go pinis na moning i kamap. Em i de namba wan.
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