EnglishEdit

 
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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English quik, quic, from Old English cwic (alive), from Proto-West Germanic *kwik(k)w, from Proto-Germanic *kwikwaz, from Proto-Indo-European *gʷih₃wós (alive), from *gʷeyh₃- (to live), *gʷeyh₃w- (to live).

Cognate with Dutch kwik, kwiek, German keck, Swedish kvick; and (from Indo-European) with Ancient Greek βίος (bíos, life), Latin vivus, Lithuanian gývas (alive), Latvian dzīvs (alive), Russian живо́й (živój), Welsh byw (alive), Irish beo (alive), biathaigh (feed), Northern Kurdish jîn (to live), jiyan (life), giyan (soul), can (soul), Sanskrit जीव (jīva, living), Albanian nxit (to urge, stimulate). Doublet of jiva.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /kwɪk/, [kʷw̥ɪk]
  • (file)
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  • Rhymes: -ɪk

AdjectiveEdit

quick (comparative quicker, superlative quickest)

  1. Moving with speed, rapidity or swiftness, or capable of doing so; rapid; fast.
    I ran to the station – but I wasn't quick enough.
    He's a quick runner.
  2. Occurring in a short time; happening or done rapidly.
    That was a quick meal.
  3. Lively, fast-thinking, witty, intelligent.
    You have to be very quick to be able to compete in ad-lib theatrics.
  4. Mentally agile, alert, perceptive.
    My father is old but he still has a quick wit.
  5. Of temper: easily aroused to anger; quick-tempered.
    He is wont to be rather quick of temper when tired.
    • 1549, Hugh Latimer, The Sixth Sermon Preached Before King Edward, April 6 1549
      The bishop was somewhat quick with them, and signified that he was much offended.
  6. (archaic) Alive, living.
  7. (now rare, archaic) Pregnant, especially at the stage where the foetus's movements can be felt; figuratively, alive with some emotion or feeling.
    • c. 1595–1596, William Shakespeare, “Loues Labour’s Lost”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act V, scene ii]:
      she's quick; the child brags in her belly already: tis yours
    • Section 316, Penal Code (Cap. 224, 2008 Ed.) (Singapore)
      Whoever does any act under such circumstances that if he thereby caused death he would be guilty of culpable homicide, and does by such act cause the death of a quick unborn child, shall be punished with imprisonment for a term which may extend to 10 years, and shall also be liable to fine.
    • 2012, Jerry White, London in the Eighteenth Century, Bodley Head 2017, p. 385:
      When sentenced she sought to avoid hanging by declaring herself with child – ironically, given her favourite deception – but a ‘jury of Matrons’ found her not quick.
  8. Of water: flowing.
  9. Burning, flammable, fiery.
  10. Fresh; bracing; sharp; keen.
  11. (mining, of a vein of ore) productive; not "dead" or barren

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

AdverbEdit

quick (comparative quicker, superlative quickest)

  1. Quickly, in a quick manner.
    Get rich quick.
    Come here, quick!

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

quick (plural quicks)

  1. Raw or sensitive flesh, especially that underneath finger and toe nails.
  2. Plants used in making a quickset hedge
    • 1641, John Evelyn, diary entry September 1641
      The works [] are curiously hedged with quick.
  3. The life; the mortal point; a vital part; a part susceptible to serious injury or keen feeling.
    • 1550, Hugh Latimer, Sermon Preached at Stamford, 9 October 1550
      This test nippeth, [] this toucheth the quick.
    • 1655, Thomas Fuller, James Nichols, editor, The Church History of Britain, [], volume (please specify |volume=I to III), new edition, London: [] [James Nichols] for Thomas Tegg and Son, [], published 1837, OCLC 913056315:
      How feebly and unlike themselves they reason when they come to the quick of the difference!
  4. Quitchgrass.
  5. (cricket) A fast bowler.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

quick (third-person singular simple present quicks, present participle quicking, simple past and past participle quicked)

  1. (transitive) To amalgamate surfaces prior to gilding or silvering by dipping them into a solution of mercury in nitric acid.
  2. (transitive, archaic, poetic) To quicken.
    • 1917', Thomas Hardy, At the Word 'Farewell
      I rose as if quicked by a spur I was bound to obey.

ReferencesEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

quick m (plural quicks)

  1. quick waltz

See alsoEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Middle Low German quick, from Old Saxon quik, from Proto-West Germanic *kwik(k)w, from Proto-Germanic *kwikwaz; also a Central Franconian form. Doublet of keck, which see for more.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

quick (comparative quicker, superlative am quicksten)

  1. (rather rare, dated) lively
    • 1899, Theodor Fontane, chapter 12, in Der Stechlin:
      Die Wirtin des Hauses, Frau Hagelversicherungssekretär Schickedanz, hätte diesen gelegentlichen Aufenthalt der Nichte Hartwigs eigentlich beanstanden müssen, ließ es aber gehen, weil Hedwig ein heiteres, quickes und sehr anstelliges Ding war und manches besaß, was die Schickedanz mit der Ungehörigkeit des ewigen Dienstwechsels wieder aussöhnte.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

Usage notesEdit

  • Much more common than the simplex is the pleonastic compound quicklebendig.

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit