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See also: NAPE

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EnglishEdit

 
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A geisha, with unpainted nape.

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English nape, naape, of uncertain origin. Possibly from Old French hanap (goblet), from Frankish *hnapp, from Proto-Germanic *hnappaz ( > Old English hnæpp, hnæp (cup, bowl, goblet)), as there is a hollow at the base of the skull.[1]. More at nap.

NounEdit

nape (plural napes)

  1. The back part of the neck.
  2. (zoology) The part of a fish immediately behind the head.
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English, from Old French nape, nappe (a cloth), from Medieval Latin nappa, napa (cloth, table-cloth, sheet), alteration of Latin mappa (a cloth, napkin, towel). More at map, apron.

NounEdit

nape (plural napes)

  1. (obsolete) A tablecloth.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Short for napalm.

VerbEdit

nape (third-person singular simple present napes, present participle naping, simple past and past participle naped)

  1. To bombard with napalm.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ nape” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2018.

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Unknown.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

nape (plural napys)

  1. The nape; the neck's rear.
  2. The nape of a fish; the part below a fish's head.
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old French nape, nappe, from Medieval Latin nappa.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

nape

  1. (rare except in compound words) tablecloth
Related termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • English: nape (obsolete)
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Old English hnappian.

VerbEdit

nape

  1. Alternative form of nappen

Etymology 4Edit

From nape (noun).

VerbEdit

nape

  1. Alternative form of napyn

Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

nape f (oblique plural napes, nominative singular nape, nominative plural napes)

  1. table cloth

DescendantsEdit

See alsoEdit