nocturnal

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin nocturnus (nocturnal, nightly), from Latin nox (night), from Proto-Indo-European *nókʷts (night). Cognates include Ancient Greek νύξ (nuks), Sanskrit नक्ति (nákti), Old English niht (English night) and Proto-Slavic *noťь.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

nocturnal (not comparable)

  1. (of a person, creature, group, or species) Primarily active during the night.
    nocturnal birds
  2. (of an occurrence) Taking place at night.
    • 2013 January 1, Paul Bartel, Ashli Moore, “Avian Migration: The Ultimate Red-Eye Flight”, American Scientist, volume 101, number 1, page 47–48: 
      Many of these classic methods are still used, with some modern improvements. For example, with the aid of special microphones and automated sound detection software, ornithologists recently reported […] that pine siskins (Spinus pinus) undergo an irregular, nomadic type of nocturnal migration.
    a suspicious nocturnal outing

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Last modified on 2 April 2014, at 20:25