Last modified on 1 October 2014, at 13:12

ome

See also: -ome

Aneme WakeEdit

NounEdit

ome

  1. ear

Classical NahuatlEdit

Classical Nahuatl cardinal numbers
1 2 3
    Cardinal : ōme
    Ordinal : ic ōme
    Adverbial : ōppa

EtymologyEdit

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

PronunciationEdit

NumeralEdit

ōme

  1. two

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


OccitanEdit

NounEdit

ome m (plural omes)

  1. (Mistralian) man (male adult human being)

Old PortugueseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin homō (man), hominem, from Old Latin hemō, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰǵʰm̥mō (earthling).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ome m

  1. man (male adult human being)
  2. man (the human race in its entirety)
    • 13th century, attributed to Alfonso X of Castile, Cantigas de Santa Maria, To codex, cantiga 423 (facsimile):
      Eſta primeira é de comel fez ó çeo. ⁊ á terra. ⁊ ó mar ⁊ o ſol. ⁊ á lũa. ⁊ as eſtrelas ⁊ todalas outras couſas q̇ ſon. ⁊ como fez ó ome áſa ſemellança
      This first one is (about) how He made the heaven, and the earth, and the sea, and the sun, and the moon, and the stars, and everything else that exists. And how (He) made man in His own likeness.

Coordinate termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


VolapükEdit

PronounEdit

ome

  1. dative singular of om: "to him"

WalloonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French om, from Latin homo.

NounEdit

ome m (plural omes)

  1. man
  2. husband

Coordinate termsEdit