See also: omè, òme, -ome, 'ome, and OME

English

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Etymology

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From the suffix -ome. Compare ology.

Noun

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ome (plural omes)

  1. (biology) The totality of a certain type of biological molecule, such as the genome or proteome.
    • 2012, OMICS: Biomedical Perspectives and Applications[1], →ISBN, page 190:
      The four basic omes, their major interactions, and the evolution of other human omes.
    • 2013, George M. Church, “Reading and writing omes”, in Molecular Systems Biology, →DOI:
      The series is launched with a review from the Snyder group on reading human omes
    • 2016, J. A. Stallins, D. M. Law, S. A. Strosberg, J. J. Rossi, “Geography and postgenomics: how space and place are the new DNA”, in GeoJournal[2], →DOI:
      Proposing a new ome has become a way of validating the importance, relevance, and financial promise of a research program.
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Aneme Wake

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Noun

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ome

  1. ear

Central Huasteca Nahuatl

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Etymology

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Cognate to Classical Nahuatl ome

Numeral

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ome

  1. two.

Central Nahuatl

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Central Nahuatl cardinal numbers
 <  1 2 3  > 
    Cardinal : ome
    Ordinal : inic ome

Etymology

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Cognate to Classical Nahuatl ome

Numeral

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ome

  1. two.

References

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  • Herrera López, Hermilo (2015); Diccionario de la lengua Náhuatl de Texcoco, Instituto Mexiquense de los pueblos indígenas. Academia de la lengua náhuatl de Texcoco, Mexico City, Mexico.

Classical Nahuatl

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Classical Nahuatl cardinal numbers
 <  1 2 3  > 
    Cardinal : ōme
    Ordinal : ic ōme
    Adverbial : ōppa
    Distributive : ōōme, ohōme

Alternative forms

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Etymology

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(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation

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Numeral

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ōme

  1. two

Derived terms

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References

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Eastern Huasteca Nahuatl

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Eastern Huasteca Nahuatl cardinal numbers
 <  1 2 3  > 
    Cardinal : ome
    Ordinal : ompa

Etymology

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Cognate to Classical Nahuatl ome

Numeral

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ome

  1. two.

Occitan

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Old Occitan ome, from Latin homō.

Noun

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ome m (plural omes)

  1. (Mistralian) man (male adult human being)

Old Galician-Portuguese

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Latin homō (man).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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ome m

  1. man (male adult human being)
  2. man (the human race in its entirety)
    • Eſta primeira é de comel fez ó çeo. ⁊ á terra. ⁊ ó mar ⁊ o ſol. ⁊ á lũa. ⁊ as eſtrelas ⁊ todalas outras couſas q̇ ſon. ⁊ como fez ó ome áſa ſemellança
      This first one is (about) how He made the heaven, and the earth, and the sea, and the sun, and the moon, and the stars, and everything else that exists. And how (He) made man in His own likeness.

Coordinate terms

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Descendants

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Old Occitan

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Latin homō.

Noun

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ome m (oblique plural omes, nominative singular om, nominative plural ome)

  1. man (adult male human being)
  2. vassal

Pronoun

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ome

  1. (indefinite) Used to indicate an unspecified individual: one, people, you, someone
    • 13th c., Aimeric de Belenoi, Anc puois qe giois ni cantç 28–29:
      q'enperis ne reinhatç ¶ non fan ome grasir, mas cors verais
      For neither empire nor kingdom makes one liked, but an honest heart [does]

Descendants

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References

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Old Spanish

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Noun

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ome

  1. Alternative form of omne

Ometepec Nahuatl

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Adjective

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ome

  1. two.

Volapük

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Pronoun

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ome

  1. dative singular of om: "to him"

Walloon

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Etymology

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From Old French ome, from Latin homō.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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ome m (plural omes)

  1. man
  2. husband

Coordinate terms

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