See also: Hom, hôm, hǫm, hợm, and hom.

AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch hem.

PronounEdit

hom (subject hy, possessive sy)

  1. third-person singular object pronoun
    1. him (referring to a male person)
      Ek sien hom nie.
      I can’t see him.
    2. it (referring to a non-personal noun)
      Sy het my die boek gegee, maar ek het hom nog nie gelees nie.
      She gave me the book, but I haven’t read it yet.

SynonymsEdit

See alsoEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Catalan hom, from the nominative case of Latin homō (man). Its pronominal use is of Germanic origin. Compare Old English man (one, they, people), reduced form of Old English mann (man, person); French on; German man (one, they, people); Dutch men (one, they, people).

Doublet of home (man), from Old Catalan (h)ome(n), that continues the accusative case form hominem. There are very few Latin nouns that have been inherited in more than one case form, others include drac/dragó and res/re.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

hom

  1. one, people, someone (an unspecified individual: indefinite personal pronoun).
    Hom diu que…It is said that…

DeclensionEdit

See alsoEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

hom f (plural hommen, diminutive hommetje n)

  1. (Netherlands) milt (fish semen)

DescendantsEdit

  • Papiamentu: hom (dated)

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English hām, from Proto-Germanic *haimaz (home, house, village), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱóymos.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hom (plural homes or heomen)

  1. home, residence, dwelling
  2. house, housing
  3. accommodation, rest
  4. (figuratively) seat, headquarters, centre
  5. (rare) village, town
Alternative formsEdit

AdverbEdit

hom

  1. home, homeward

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

PronounEdit

hom

  1. Alternative form of hem (them)

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

hom (plural homes)

  1. Alternative form of hamme (enclosure, meadow)

Etymology 4Edit

PronounEdit

hom

  1. Alternative form of whom (who, whom, accusative)

MòchenoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German haben, from Old High German hāben, from Proto-West Germanic *habbjan, from Proto-Germanic *habjaną (to have; to hold). Cognate with German haben, English have.

VerbEdit

hom

  1. to have
    Mu i hom a kòmmer as tschins?Can I have a room to rent?

ReferencesEdit

  • “hom” in Cimbrian, Ladin, Mòcheno: Getting to know 3 peoples. 2015. Servizio minoranze linguistiche locali della Provincia autonoma di Trento, Trento, Italy.
  • “hom” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle isole linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse hvammr. Doublet of kvam.

NounEdit

hom m (definite singular homen, indefinite plural homar, definite plural homane)

  1. a little vale

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin homō.

NounEdit

hom m

  1. nominative singular of home

DescendantsEdit

  • French: on

ZuniEdit

PronounEdit

hom

  1. First person singular possessive (medial position)
    my
  2. First person singular object
    me

Related termsEdit