CatalanEdit

NounEdit

ce f (plural ces)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter C.

Derived termsEdit


Classical NahuatlEdit

Classical Nahuatl cardinal numbers
 <  0 1 2  > 
    Cardinal : ce
    Ordinal : ic ce
    Adverbial : ceppa
    Distributive : cēcen, cehcen

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

PronunciationEdit

NumeralEdit

ce

  1. (it is) one in number.

Usage notesEdit

  • The combing form of ce is cen- (or cem- before m and p).

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Eastern Huasteca NahuatlEdit

Eastern Huasteca Nahuatl cardinal numbers
 <  0 1 2  > 
    Cardinal : ce
    Ordinal : achtohui

EtymologyEdit

Cognate to Classical Nahuatl ce

NumeralEdit

ce

  1. one.

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /sə/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes:
  • Homophone: se

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle French [Term?], from Old French cel, from earlier cil, from Vulgar Latin *ecce illu, from Latin ecce or eccum illum, from ille.

DeterminerEdit

ce m (masculine before vowel cet, feminine cette, plural ces)

  1. this, that

Etymology 2Edit

Probably from Latin ecce hoc.

Alternative formsEdit
  • c' (before the vowels /ɛ/, /y/)
  • ç'[1] (dated, before the vowel /a/)

PronounEdit

ce m (plural ce)

  1. (subject of être, with predicative adjectives or relative clauses, singular only) it, this, that (see § Usage notes, below)
    C'est beau !It is beautiful!
    ce dont je parlaisthat which I was speaking of
    C'eût été avec plaisir, mais...It would have been with pleasure, but...
    C'eût été dommage...It would have been a pity...
  2. (subject of être, with predicate nouns) he, she, it, this, that
    C'est un/e célébrité.He/she/it is a celebrity.
    Ce sont des célébrités.These are celebrities.
    • 1897, Edmond Rostand, Cyrano de Bergerac :
      C'est un roc ! ... c'est un pic ! ... c'est un cap ! Que dis-je, c'est un cap ? ... C'est une péninsule !
  3. (archaic, subject of verbs other than être) it, this, that
    • 1866, (Please provide the book title or journal name)[2], page 56:
      [...] ce paraissent être encore là des points à noter [...]
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
    ce sembleit seems
    ce peuvent être...these may be...
Usage notesEdit

(1): To convey the plural with a predicative adjective, one must use ils or elles (they):

Ils sont beaux ! Elles sont belles !They are beautiful!

And to convey the plural with a relative clause, one must use ceux or celles (plural forms of celui and celle):

ceux que/celles que...those which...
ceux qui/celles qui...those who/that...
ceux dont je parlais/celles dont je parlais...those which I was speaking of...
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Louis Philipon De La Madelaine (1802) Des homonymes français ou mots qui dans notre langue se ressemblent par le son et diffèrent par le sens[1], page 85

Further readingEdit


FriulianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin quid. Compare Italian che, Venetian ché, Romanian ce.

PronounEdit

ce

  1. what

See alsoEdit


IdoEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ce (plural ce-i)

  1. The name of the Latin script letter C/c.

See alsoEdit


ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • Rhymes: -e

PronounEdit

ce

  1. Alternative form of ci (us)

Usage notesEdit

Used when followed by a third-person direct object clitic (lo, la, li, le, or ne).

See alsoEdit

AdverbEdit

ce

  1. here

Italiot GreekEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek καί (kaí).

ConjunctionEdit

ce

  1. and

LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

 f (indeclinable)

  1. The name of the letter C.

Coordinate termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • ce in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • ce in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • ce in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Arthur E. Gordon, The Letter Names of the Latin Alphabet (University of California Press, 1973; volume 9 of University of California Publications: Classical Studies), part III: “Summary of the Ancient Evidence”, page 32: "Clearly there is no question or doubt about the names of the vowels A, E, I, O, U. They are simply long A, long E, etc. (ā, ē, ī, ō, ū). Nor is there any uncertainty with respect to the six mutes B, C, D, G, P, T. Their names are bē, cē, dē, gē, pē, tē (each with a long E). Or about H, K, and Q: they are hā, kā, kū—each, again, with a long vowel sound."

MandarinEdit

RomanizationEdit

ce

  1. Nonstandard spelling of .

Usage notesEdit

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

MapudungunEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • che (using Unified Alphabet)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ce (using Raguileo Alphabet)

  1. person
  2. people

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Wixaleyiñ: Mapucezugun-wigkazugun pici hemvlcijka (Wixaleyiñ: Small Mapudungun-Spanish dictionary), Beretta, Marta; Cañumil, Dario; Cañumil, Tulio, 2008.

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English .

NounEdit

ce

  1. Alternative form of see (sea)
DescendantsEdit
  • English: sea

Etymology 2Edit

From Old French sei.

NounEdit

ce

  1. Alternative form of see (see)
DescendantsEdit

Middle FrenchEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ce m (feminine singular ceste, masculine and feminine plural ces, masculine singular before a vowel cest)

  1. this (the one in question)
    • 1571, Pedro Díaz, Dallier, Nouueaux advertissemens trescertains venus du paÿs des Indes Meridionales [] page 5
      Mais considerant que les Chrestiens nouvellement faits en ce pays, estoient en si grand nombre que nous ne les pouvions visiter
      But considering that the newly made Christians in this country were so numerous that we couldn't visit all of them

NeapolitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ecce.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

ce (adverbial)

  1. there (at a place)

OccitanEdit

NounEdit

ce f (plural ces)

  1. cee (the letter c)

Old IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

ce

  1. Alternative form of cía

ConjunctionEdit

ce

  1. Alternative form of cía
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 34a4
      ɔrabad cech bráthair post alium .i. is huisse ce ru·samaltar fri Críst
      so that each brother should be after the other, i.e. it is right that he be compared to Christ

PochutecEdit

EtymologyEdit

C.f. Classical Nahuatl .

PronunciationEdit

NumeralEdit

ce

  1. one

ReferencesEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin quid, from Proto-Indo-European *kʷid, compare *kʷis.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

ce

  1. what
    Ce vrei faci?
    What do you want to do?

Related termsEdit


SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ce f (plural ces)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter C.

Further readingEdit


TarantinoEdit

PronounEdit

ce (relative)

  1. who

ConjunctionEdit

ce

  1. if

TurkishEdit

NounEdit

ce

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter C.

See alsoEdit


WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ce f (plural ceau)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter K.

MutationEdit

This word cannot be mutated.

See alsoEdit