EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin orbita (a circuit, orbit).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

orbita (plural orbitae)

  1. (anatomy) Obsolete form of orbit.

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

VerbEdit

orbita

  1. third-person singular present indicative form of orbitar
  2. second-person singular imperative form of orbitar

CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

orbita f

  1. orbit (the bony cavity containing the eyeball)
    Synonyms: oční důlek, oční jamka, očnice

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit

  • orbita in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • orbita in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989
  • orbita in Internetová jazyková příručka

EsperantoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From orbito +‎ -a.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • IPA(key): [orˈbita]
  • Rhymes: -ita
  • Hyphenation: or‧bi‧ta

AdjectiveEdit

orbita (accusative singular orbitan, plural orbitaj, accusative plural orbitajn)

  1. orbital

FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

orbita

  1. third-person singular past historic of orbiter

AnagramsEdit


GalicianEdit

VerbEdit

orbita

  1. third-person singular present indicative of orbitar
  2. second-person singular imperative of orbitar

ItalianEdit

 
Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin orbita.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

orbita f (plural orbite)

  1. (astronomy, mathematics) orbit
  2. (anatomy) eye socket, orbit
    Synonyms: cavità orbitale, cavità orbitaria
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

orbita

  1. inflection of orbitare:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further readingEdit

  • orbita in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From orbis (a ring, circle, orbit).

NounEdit

orbita f (genitive orbitae); first declension

  1. (literally, Classical Latin) A track or rut made in the ground by a wheel.
    1. (figuratively, Old Latin, poetic) A path, track, course.
  2. An impression or mark left by a ligature.
  3. A circuit, orbit.
InflectionEdit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative orbita orbitae
Genitive orbitae orbitārum
Dative orbitae orbitīs
Accusative orbitam orbitās
Ablative orbitā orbitīs
Vocative orbita orbitae
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

NounEdit

orbitā f

  1. ablative singular of orbita

ReferencesEdit

  • orbita”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • orbita”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • orbita in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • orbita in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette

PolishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin orbita, from Latin orbis.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɔrˈbi.ta/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ita
  • Syllabification: or‧bi‧ta

NounEdit

orbita f

  1. (astronomy) orbit

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • orbita in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • orbita in Polish dictionaries at PWN

PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

orbita

  1. Third-person singular (ele, ela, also used with tu and você?) present indicative of orbitar
  2. Second-person singular (tu) affirmative imperative of orbitar

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

orbita

  1. inflection of orbitar:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative