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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Old French ordure, from ord (filthy), from Latin horridus (horrid), + -ure.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ordure (countable and uncountable, plural ordures)

  1. Excrement; dung.
    • 1988, Anthony Burgess, Any Old Iron
      The bowels and bladder collapsed, sheets and mattress had to be burnt at the bottom of the back garden. The body, having vulgarly shed its ordures, now turned into an ordure itself.
    • 1922, Virginia Woolf, Jacob's Room, Vintage Classics, paperback edition, page 99
      Only Madame herself seeing Jacob out had about her that leer, that lewdness, that quake of the surface (visible in the eyes chiefly), which threatens to spill the whole bag of ordure, with difficulty held together, over the pavement.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French ord (filthy), from Latin horridus (horrid), + -ure.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ordure f (plural ordures)

  1. garbage, refuse
  2. dung, animal faeces
  3. (slang) obscenity, filthy material
  4. (slang, derogatory) a filthy person

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit