See also: Ord, òrd, orð, and -ord

English edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Noun edit

ord

  1. Abbreviation of order.
  2. (law) Abbreviation of ordinance.

Etymology 2 edit

From Middle English ord (point, point of a weapon, beginning), from Old English ord (point, spear-point, spear, source, beginning, front, vanguard), from Proto-West Germanic *oʀd, from Proto-Germanic *uzdaz (point), of obscure origin (see *uzdaz).

Cognate with Middle English ord, North Frisian od (tip, place, beginning), Dutch oord (place, region), German Ort (location, place, position), Danish od (a point), Swedish udd (a point, prick), Icelandic oddur (tip, point of a weapon, leader). See also odd.

Alternative forms edit

Noun edit

ord (plural ords)

  1. (now chiefly UK dialectal) A point.
  2. (now chiefly UK dialectal) A point of origin; a beginning.
    • 1897, Frank Cowan, The millionaire:
      "[...] But such is life — hard upon hard from ord to end; and if I had not been made of the best of neat-leather, the longer in water the tougher, I would have melted away with my tears long ago!"
    • 1924, Adriaan Jacob Barnouw Esmoreit, An ingenious play of Esmoreit: the king's son of Sicily:
      [...] Tell me wholly as it was From ord to end how it did pass When first your father was of me ware.
  3. (now chiefly UK dialectal) A point of land; a promontory.
    • 1900, Cai.:
      When a man came from Sutherland into Caithness over the Ord [of Caithness, in the southern tip of the county], he was called an ord-louper .
  4. (now chiefly UK dialectal) The point or edge of a weapon.
    Saul drew his sword, And ran even upon the ord. — Cursor Mundi.
    And touched him with the spear's ord. — Romance of Sir Otuel.
    • 1814, Henry William Weber, Robert Jamieson, Sir Walter Scott, Illustrations of northern antiquities:
      Hadubraht, the son of Hiltibrant, said, "Gladly gifts should be received; ord (spear's point) against ord.
Derived terms edit

Anagrams edit

Azerbaijani edit

Noun edit

ord (definite accusative ordu, plural ordlar)

  1. Alternative form of ovurd (inside of cheek)

Declension edit

    Declension of ord
singular plural
nominative ord
ordlar
definite accusative ordu
ordları
dative orda
ordlara
locative ordda
ordlarda
ablative orddan
ordlardan
definite genitive ordun
ordların
    Possessive forms of ord
nominative
singular plural
mənim (my) ordum ordlarım
sənin (your) ordun ordların
onun (his/her/its) ordu ordları
bizim (our) ordumuz ordlarımız
sizin (your) ordunuz ordlarınız
onların (their) ordu or ordları ordları
accusative
singular plural
mənim (my) ordumu ordlarımı
sənin (your) ordunu ordlarını
onun (his/her/its) ordunu ordlarını
bizim (our) ordumuzu ordlarımızı
sizin (your) ordunuzu ordlarınızı
onların (their) ordunu or ordlarını ordlarını
dative
singular plural
mənim (my) orduma ordlarıma
sənin (your) orduna ordlarına
onun (his/her/its) orduna ordlarına
bizim (our) ordumuza ordlarımıza
sizin (your) ordunuza ordlarınıza
onların (their) orduna or ordlarına ordlarına
locative
singular plural
mənim (my) ordumda ordlarımda
sənin (your) ordunda ordlarında
onun (his/her/its) ordunda ordlarında
bizim (our) ordumuzda ordlarımızda
sizin (your) ordunuzda ordlarınızda
onların (their) ordunda or ordlarında ordlarında
ablative
singular plural
mənim (my) ordumdan ordlarımdan
sənin (your) ordundan ordlarından
onun (his/her/its) ordundan ordlarından
bizim (our) ordumuzdan ordlarımızdan
sizin (your) ordunuzdan ordlarınızdan
onların (their) ordundan or ordlarından ordlarından
genitive
singular plural
mənim (my) ordumun ordlarımın
sənin (your) ordunun ordlarının
onun (his/her/its) ordunun ordlarının
bizim (our) ordumuzun ordlarımızın
sizin (your) ordunuzun ordlarınızın
onların (their) ordunun or ordlarının ordlarının

Further reading edit

  • ord” in Obastan.com.

Danish edit

 
Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia da

Etymology edit

From Old Norse orð, from Proto-Germanic *wurdą, cognate with English word, German Wort. The Germanic noun goes back to Proto-Indo-European *werdʰh₁om (word), which is also the source of Latin verbum.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

ord n (singular definite ordet, plural indefinite ord)

  1. word (a single word)
  2. word (an utterance)

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

Irish edit

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Irish ord, from Proto-Celtic *ordos (whence also Welsh gordd and Breton horzh).[2] Connections outside Celtic are uncertain, but it may be related to Old Armenian ուռն (uṙn, hammer).

Noun edit

ord m (genitive singular oird, nominative plural oird)

  1. sledgehammer
    • 1899, Franz Nikolaus Finck, Die araner mundart, volume II (overall work in German), Marburg: Elwert’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, page 12:
      kā giŕcr̥ ə dæšḱə n t-aurd ə viəs agī ə bŕišə nə glox?
      [Cá gcuirtear i dtaisce an t-ord a bhíos agaibh a briseadh na gcloch?]
      Where is the sledgehammer you have for breaking the rocks kept?
    • 1899, Franz Nikolaus Finck, Die araner mundart, volume II (overall work in German), Marburg: Elwert’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, page 12:
      fāȷīš nə h-aurȷ.
      [Faighidís na hoird.]
      Let them fetch the sledgehammers.

Etymology 2 edit

From Old Irish ord, ordd, from Latin ōrdō.[3]

Noun edit

ord m (genitive singular oird, nominative plural oird)

  1. (religion, agriculture, etc.) order
  2. sequence, arrangement
  3. (literary) ordered manner, rule
  4. (literary) function
  5. (ecclesiastical) prescribed form of service
Derived terms edit

Declension edit

Mutation edit

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
ord n-ord hord t-ord
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References edit

  1. ^ Quiggin, E. C. (1906) A Dialect of Donegal, Cambridge University Press, page 97
  2. ^ G. Toner, M. Ní Mhaonaigh, S. Arbuthnot, D. Wodtko, M.-L. Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “2 ord(d) ‘sledgehammer’”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  3. ^ G. Toner, M. Ní Mhaonaigh, S. Arbuthnot, D. Wodtko, M.-L. Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “1 ord(d) ‘order, sequence’”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Further reading edit

Middle English edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old English ord. Akin to Old Frisian ord (place, point), Old Saxon ord (point), Old High German ort (point, beginning), Old Norse oddr (point of a weapon). More at odd.

Noun edit

ord

  1. a point
  2. the point of a weapon
  3. a point of origin, beginning

Descendants edit

  • English: ord

Norwegian Bokmål edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse orð, from Proto-Germanic *wurdą, from Proto-Indo-European *werdʰo- (word). Cognates include Danish ord, Swedish ord, German Wort, and English word.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

ord n (definite singular ordet, indefinite plural ord, definite plural orda or ordene)

  1. a word (a distinct unit of language with a particular meaning)
    Jeg forstår ikke dette ordet.I can’t understand this word.
  2. word (something promised)
    Jeg gir deg mitt ord på at jeg skal være der i tide.I give you my word that I will be there on time.
  3. word (a discussion)
    Kunne vi få et ord med deg?Could we have a word with you?
  4. reputation
    Han har godt ord på seg.He has a good reputation.
  5. (definite singular only) permission to speak
    Jeg overlater ordet til min kollega.I’ll let my colleague speak.

Derived terms edit

References edit

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse orð, from Proto-Germanic *wurdą, from Proto-Indo-European *werdʰo- (word). Akin to English word.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

ord n (definite singular ordet, indefinite plural ord, definite plural orda)

  1. a word (a distinct unit of language with a particular meaning)

Derived terms edit

References edit

Old English edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-West Germanic *oʀd, from Proto-Germanic *uzdaz, from Proto-Indo-European *wes- (stab).

Cognate with Middle Dutch ort (Dutch oord), Old High German ort (German Ort), Old Norse oddr (Icelandic oddur, Swedish udd, Danish od).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

ord m

  1. point (especially of a weapon)
    Þæs sweordes ord is swīðe sċearp.
    The point of the sword is very sharp.
  2. point of origin, beginning
  3. front; vanguard, chief
    • Finnesburh Fragment, line 12:
      ... winnað on orde, wesað on mōde.
      ... fight in the vanguard, be of [good] mood.

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

Romansch edit

Etymology edit

From Latin foras de.

Adverb edit

ord

  1. outside

Swedish edit

Etymology edit

From Old Swedish orþ, from Old Norse orð, from Proto-Germanic *wurdą, from Proto-Indo-European *werdʰo- (word).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈuːrd/, [ˈuːɖ]
  • (file)

Noun edit

ord n (plural ord, definite singular ordet, definite plural orden)

  1. (linguistics) word; A distinct unit of language (sounds in speech or written letters) with a particular meaning, composed of one or more morphemes, and also of one or more phonemes that determine its sound pattern.
  2. Something promised.
  3. (computing) A numerical value with a bit width native to the machine.

Declension edit

Declension of ord 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative ord ordet ord orden
Genitive ords ordets ords ordens

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit