See also: Pätter

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  This entry needs audio files. If you have a microphone, please record some and upload them. (For audio required quickly, visit WT:APR.)

Etymology 1Edit

1610s, pat +‎ -er (frequentative (indicating repeated action)),[1] of (onomatopoeia) origin.

NounEdit

patter (plural patters)

  1. A soft repeated sound, as of rain falling, or feet walking on a hard surface.
    I could hear the patter of mice running about in the dark.
    • 1907, Harold Bindloss, chapter 7, in The Dust of Conflict[1]:
      The patter of feet, and clatter of strap and swivel, seemed to swell into a bewildering din, but they were almost upon the fielato offices, where the carretera entered the town, before a rifle flashed.
TranslationsEdit
Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

patter (third-person singular simple present patters, present participle pattering, simple past and past participle pattered)

  1. To make irregularly repeated sounds of low-to-moderate magnitude and lower-than-average pitch.
    The bullets pattered into the log-cabin walls.
  2. To spatter; to sprinkle.

TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Circa 1400, from paternoster (the Lord's prayer),[1] possibly influenced by imitative sense (above), Latin pater (father), from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂tḗr.

Noun attested 1758, originally referring to the cant of thieves and beggers.[1]

NounEdit

patter (countable and uncountable, plural patters)

  1. Glib and rapid speech, such as from an auctioneer or a sports commentator.
    • 1887, Gilbert and Sullivan, "My Eyes Are Fully Open", Ruddigore
      This particularly rapid, unintelligible patter isn't generally heard, and if it is it doesn't matter.
TranslationsEdit
Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

patter (third-person singular simple present patters, present participle pattering, simple past and past participle pattered)

  1. To speak glibly and rapidly, as does an auctioneer or a sports commentator.
    • (Can we date this quote by Mayhew and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      I've gone out and pattered to get money.
  2. (intransitive, obsolete) To repeat the Lord's Prayer.
  3. (intransitive, obsolete) To pray.
  4. (transitive, obsolete) To repeat hurriedly; to mutter.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

pat +‎ -er (agent)

NounEdit

patter (plural patters)

  1. One who pats.
    • 1981, Jackie Cooper, ‎Richard Kleiner, Please Shoot Dog (page 50)
      I used to hate head patters, and I have realized that all children dislike being patted on the head.

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 patter” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2020.

AnagramsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

NounEdit

patter m

  1. indefinite plural of patte

Norwegian NynorskEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

patter

  1. indefinite feminine plural of patte