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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French pillage, from piller (plunder), from an unattested meaning of Late Latin piliō, probably a figurative use of Latin pilō (I remove (hair)), from pilus (hair).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpɪl.ɪdʒ/, /ˈpɪl.ədʒ/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪlədʒ

VerbEdit

pillage (third-person singular simple present pillages, present participle pillaging, simple past and past participle pillaged)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To loot or plunder by force, especially in time of war.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

pillage (countable and uncountable, plural pillages)

  1. The spoils of war.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Shakespeare
      Which pillage they with merry march bring home.
  2. The act of pillaging.
    • 2013, Zoë Marriage, Formal Peace and Informal War: Security and Development in Congo
      An employee at a brewery in Kinshasa rated the aftermath as more catastrophic to the company than the direct violence: It was more the consequences of the pillages that hit Bracongo – the poverty of the people, our friends who buy beer.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

piller +‎ -age

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pillage m (plural pillages)

  1. pillage

NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French pillage.

NounEdit

pillage m (plural pillages)

  1. (Jersey) looting

Related termsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

pillage m (oblique plural pillages, nominative singular pillages, nominative plural pillage)

  1. pillaging

Related termsEdit