English

edit

Etymology

edit

From Ancient Greek πολύς (polús, many, much), from Proto-Indo-European *polh₁ús (much, many).

Pronunciation

edit

(stress on first syllable; e.g., polymath)

(stress on second syllable; e.g., polyphony)

Prefix

edit

poly-

  1. many
    polydactyl, polyglot, polyvalent
    Synonyms: multi-; pleo-, pleio-
    Antonyms: mono-, uni-
    Coordinate terms: bi-, di-, tri-, etc; oligo-, pauci-
  2. polymer
    polyacetal, polyethene, polyether
  3. polyamory
    polycule, polyphobia, polyfamily

Derived terms

edit

Translations

edit

References

edit

Further reading

edit

Anagrams

edit

Dutch

edit

Etymology

edit

From Ancient Greek πολύς (polús, many, much), from Proto-Indo-European *polh₁ús (much, many).

Pronunciation

edit
  • Audio:(file)

Prefix

edit

poly-

  1. poly-

Derived terms

edit

Finnish

edit

Etymology

edit

From Ancient Greek πολύς (polús).

Pronunciation

edit
  • IPA(key): /ˈpoly/, [ˈpo̞ly]
  • IPA(key): /ˈpolu/, [ˈpo̞lu]

Prefix

edit

poly-

  1. poly-

Usage notes

edit

Terms that violate Finnish vowel harmony are occasionally adapted to fit it, particularly in colloquial speech. As such, poly- may be pronounced polu-.

Derived terms

edit

French

edit

Etymology

edit

From Ancient Greek πολύς (polús, many, much), from Proto-Indo-European *polh₁ús (much, many).

Pronunciation

edit

Prefix

edit

poly-

  1. poly- (many)
    Synonyms: multi-, pluri-
    Antonyms: mono-, uni-

Derived terms

edit

German

edit

Etymology

edit

Ultimately from Ancient Greek πολύς (polús, many, much).

Pronunciation

edit

Prefix

edit

poly-

  1. poly-

Derived terms

edit

Norwegian Nynorsk

edit

Etymology

edit

From Ancient Greek πολύς (polús, many, much), from Proto-Indo-European *polh₁ús (much, many). Related to full and fleire.

Prefix

edit

poly-

  1. poly-
    Synonyms: fleir-, mange-
    Antonym: (often) mono-

Derived terms

edit

References

edit