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See also: Moni, Móni, mõni, mónǐ, and moni-

Contents

ChichewaEdit

EtymologyEdit

Unknown; possibilities include English morning (short for good morning), or a worn-down form of kuona (to see) or moyoni (life to you).

PronunciationEdit

InterjectionEdit

móni!

  1. hello!

ChuukeseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English money.

NounEdit

moni

  1. money

CicipuEdit

NounEdit

moni

  1. water

ReferencesEdit


FinnishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Finnic *moni, from Proto-Finno-Permic [Term?]. Cognate to Estonian mõni (some), Ingrian moni (many, some), Ingrian monikas (some one, few), Karelian moni, Karelian monies (few, some one), Votic meni, Votic menikaz (few), Estonian mõnd (many), Livonian muunda (many), Northern Sami moanak, Udmurt мында (mynda, as much as), Udmurt со мында (so mynda, so much).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈmoni/, [ˈmo̞ni]

DeterminerEdit

moni

  1. many
    Moni opiskelija joutuu elämään toimeentulon rajoilla.
    Many students are forced to live at the subsistence level.
  2. (aika ~ or melko ~) few, quite a few
    Join aika monta olutta.
    I had quite a few beers.

PronounEdit

moni

  1. (indefinite, without a noun, refers often to people) many people, many
    Moni voisi ajatella samoin.
    Many people could think the same.
  2. (in compounds) poly-, multi-, many-
  3. (aika ~ or melko ~) few, quite a few
    Melko moni tahtoo olutta.
    Quite a few people want beer.

Usage notesEdit

When used as the grammatical subject in a sentence the use of moni differs according to the linguistic style.

In formal Finnish, moni is the plural marker and the following noun (if any) and verb are in the singular.

In informal Finnish the plural form "monet" is used and the modified noun and the following verb are plural.

  • moni lapsi syö puuroa aamiaiseksi (formal language style)
    • many children eat porridge for breakfast
      • = many a child eats porridge for breakfast
  • monet lapset syövät puuroa aamiaiseksi (informal language style)
    • many children eat porridge for breakfast

When used as the grammatical object in a sentence, both moni and the noun it qualifies follow the case dictated by the verb.

  • pystyn vaikuttamaan moniin ihmisiin.. (illative case dictated by vaikuttaa)
    • I'm able to influence many people..
  • rakastan montaa ihmistä (partitive case dictated by rakastaa; double partitive (montaa) necessary as "monta" has been reanalyzed as nominative)
    • I love many people

DeclensionEdit

  • Note the colloquial essive singular form monna and the double partitive montaa.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


IngrianEdit

PronounEdit

moni

  1. some

KikuyuEdit

PronunciationEdit

As for Tonal Class, Benson (1964) classifies this term into Class 3 with a disyllabic stem, together with kĩhaato, mbembe, kiugo, and so on.
  • (Kiambu)

NounEdit

moni class 9/10 (plural moni)

  1. ear lobe

HolonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Yukawa, Yasutoshi (1981). "A Tentative Tonal Analysis of Kikuyu Nouns: A Study of Limuru Dialect." In Journal of Asian and African Studies, No. 22, 75–123.
  • “moni” in Benson, T.G. (1964). Kikuyu-English dictionary, p. 263. Oxford: Clarendon Press.

MaoriEdit

NounEdit

moni

  1. money, cash

Nigerian PidginEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English money.

NounEdit

moni

  1. money

Northern SamiEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (Kautokeino) IPA(key): /ˈmoniː/

NounEdit

moni

  1. accusative and genitive singular of monni

SamoanEdit

AdjectiveEdit

moni

  1. real
  2. related by blood; biological

Sranan TongoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English money.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

moni

  1. money

TahitianEdit

NounEdit

moni

  1. money

Tok PisinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English money.

NounEdit

moni

  1. money
  2. currency
  3. dollar

VolapükEdit