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See also: tiré, tirë, tíre, tìre, and тире

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English tiren, tirien, teorien, from Old English tȳrian, tēorian (to fail, cease, become weary, be tired, exhausted; tire, weary, exhaust), of uncertain origin. Possibly from Proto-Germanic *tiuzōną (to cease), which is possibly from Proto-Indo-European *dewH- (to fail, be behind, lag). Compare Ancient Greek δεύομαι (deúomai, to lack), Sanskrit दोष (dóṣa, crime, fault, vice, deficiency).[1]

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

tire (third-person singular simple present tires, present participle tiring, simple past and past participle tired)

  1. (intransitive) To become sleepy or weary.
    • 2012 September 7, Phil McNulty, “Moldova 0-5 England”, in BBC Sport[1]:
      As Moldova understandably tired after a night of ball chasing, Everton left-back Baines scored his first international goal as his deflected free-kick totally wrong-footed Namasco.
  2. (transitive) To make sleepy or weary.
  3. (intransitive) To become bored or impatient (with)
    I tire of this book.
  4. (transitive) To bore
SynonymsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ J.P. Mallory & D.Q. Adams, Encyclopedia of Indo-European Culture, s.v. "lack: deu(s)-" (London: Fitzroy-Dearborn, 1997), 343.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English tire (equipment) aphetic form of attire

Alternative formsEdit

  • (rubber covering on a wheel): tyre

NounEdit

tire (plural tires)

  1. (obsolete) Accoutrements, accessories.
  2. (obsolete) Dress, clothes, attire.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, I.vii:
      Ne spared they to strip her naked all. / Then when they had despoild her tire and call, / Such as she was, their eyes might her behold.
    • 1621, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy, Oxford: Printed by Iohn Lichfield and Iames Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 216894069; The Anatomy of Melancholy: [], 2nd corrected and augmented edition, Oxford: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, 1624, OCLC 54573970, (please specify |partition=1, 2, or 3):
      , New York Review of Books 2001, p.66:
      men like apes follow the fashions in tires, gestures, actions: if the king laugh, all laugh […].
  3. A covering for the head; a headdress.
  4. Metal rim of a wheel, especially that of a railroad locomotive.
  5. (Canada, US) The rubber covering on a wheel; a tyre.
  6. A child's apron covering the upper part of the body, and tied with tape or cord; a pinafore. Also tier.
Usage notesEdit
  • Tire is one of the few words where Canadian usage prefers the US spelling over the British spelling.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

tire (third-person singular simple present tires, present participle tiring, simple past and past participle tired)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To dress or adorn.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Bible, 2 Kings ix. 30
      [Jezebel] painted her face, and tired her head.
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English tire, from Old French tirer (to draw or pull), akin to English tear (to rend).

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

tire (third-person singular simple present tires, present participle tiring, simple past and past participle tired)

  1. (obsolete) To seize, pull, and tear prey, as a hawk does.
    • (Can we date this quote?) William Shakespeare
      Even as an empty eagle, sharp by fast, / Tires with her beak on feathers, flesh, and bone.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Ben Jonson
      Ye dregs of baseness, vultures among men, / That tire upon the hearts of generous spirits.
  2. (obsolete) To seize, rend, or tear something as prey; to be fixed upon, or engaged with, anything.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Chapman
      Thus made she her remove, / And left wrath tiring on her son.
    • (Can we date this quote?) William Shakespeare
      Upon that were my thoughts tiring.

Etymology 4Edit

NounEdit

tire (plural tires)

  1. A tier, row, or rank.
    • (Can we date this quote?) John Milton
      In posture to displode their second tire / Of thunder.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

AzerbaijaniEdit

Other scripts
Cyrillic тире
Roman tire
Perso-Arabic

EtymologyEdit

From Russian тире (tire), ultimately from French tiret.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [tiˈre]
  • Hyphenation: ti‧re

NounEdit

tire (definite accusative tireni, plural tirelər)

  1. dash (punctuation mark)

DeclensionEdit


FrenchEdit

Haitian CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French tirer (shoot).

VerbEdit

tire

  1. To shoot (hit with a bullet or arrow)

HausaEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English tray.

NounEdit

tìr̃ê m (possessed form tìr̃ên)

  1. tray

PortugueseEdit

ScotsEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

tire (third-person singular present tires, present participle tirin, past tiret, past participle tiret)

  1. to tire

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈtiɾe/, [ˈt̪iɾe]

VerbEdit

tire

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of tirar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of tirar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of tirar.
  4. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of tirar.

TurkishEdit

NounEdit

tire (definite accusative tireyi, plural tireler)

  1. "-" Hyphen-minus symbol, used as a hyphen, minus sign, and a dash.

DeclensionEdit

Inflection
Nominative tire
Definite accusative tireyi
Singular Plural
Nominative tire tireler
Definite accusative tireyi tireleri
Dative tireye tirelere
Locative tirede tirelerde
Ablative tireden tirelerden
Genitive tirenin tirelerin