See also: Posse

English edit

Etymology edit

Ellipsis of posse comitatus.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

posse (plural posses)

  1. A group or company of people, originally especially one having hostile intent; a throng, a crowd. [from 17th c.]
    • 1972, Mortimer J. Adler with Charles Van Doren, chapter 3, in How to Read a Book, Touchstone September 2014 edition, New York, NY: Simon & Schuster, →OCLC, page 23:
      It is traditional in America to criticize the schools; for more than a century, parents, self-styled experts, and educators themselves have attacked and indicted the educational system. No aspect of schooling has been more severely criticized than reading instruction. The current books have a long ancestry, and every innovation carries in its train a posse of suspicious and, one feels, unpersuadable observers.
  2. (now historical, in later use chiefly US) A group of people summoned to help law enforcement. [from 17th c.]
    Coordinate term: vigilante
    • 1751, [Tobias] Smollett, The Adventures of Peregrine Pickle [], volumes (please specify |volume=I to IV), London: Harrison and Co., [], →OCLC:
      He [] no sooner set his nose within the room to which he was directed, than the constable and his posse sprung upon him, before he had the least intimation of his design, or any opportunity of acting in his own defence.
    • 1986, Donald R. Lavash, Sheriff William Brady, Tragic Hero of the Lincoln County War, Sunstone Press, →ISBN, page 77:
      Mathews then appointed Morton as a deputy sheriff and after a posse had been selected, they went in pursuit of the criminals. Within a few hours, the posse overtook the thieves.
    • 2013, Andrew C. Isenberg, Wyatt Earp: A Vigilante Life, Hill and Wang, →ISBN, page 165:
      While Wyatt dismounted and aimed his shotgun at Brocius, the rest of his posse retreated.
  3. (US) A search party.
  4. (US, Jamaica, slang) A criminal gang. [from 20th c.]
    • 1997, Michael D. Lyman, Organized Crime, Prentice Hall, page 287:
      Jamaican posses can be traced back to the Jamaican neighborhoods, and posse names correspond to the names of each neighborhood in which the gangs operate.
  5. (colloquial) A group of (especially young) people seen as constituting a peer group or band of associates; a gang, a group of friends. [from 20th c.]
    • 2001, Salman Rushdie, Fury: A Novel, London: Jonathan Cape, →ISBN, page 4:
      Hey, sir? Sir, excuse me?” The blonde was calling out to him, in imperious tones that insisted on a reply. [] She was breaking a rule of big-city life, breaking it brazenly, sure of her power, confident of her turf and posse, fearing nothing.
    • 2014, April Boyd-Noronha, The Soul of a Single Parent: How to Snapback and Get Your SWAG On, AuthorHouse, →ISBN, page 77:
      But the few friends that I DO have are my “ride or die” chicks—my posse.

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Translations edit

References edit


Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Finnish edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English posse.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈposːe/, [ˈpo̞s̠ːe̞]
  • Rhymes: -osːe
  • Syllabification(key): pos‧se

Noun edit

posse (slang)

  1. posse, crew, gang

Declension edit

Inflection of posse (Kotus type 8/nalle, no gradation)
nominative posse posset
genitive possen possejen
partitive possea posseja
illative posseen posseihin
singular plural
nominative posse posset
accusative nom. posse posset
gen. possen
genitive possen possejen
posseinrare
partitive possea posseja
inessive possessa posseissa
elative possesta posseista
illative posseen posseihin
adessive possella posseilla
ablative posselta posseilta
allative posselle posseille
essive possena posseina
translative posseksi posseiksi
abessive possetta posseitta
instructive possein
comitative See the possessive forms below.
Possessive forms of posse (Kotus type 8/nalle, no gradation)
first-person singular possessor
singular plural
nominative posseni posseni
accusative nom. posseni posseni
gen. posseni
genitive posseni possejeni
posseinirare
partitive posseani possejani
inessive possessani posseissani
elative possestani posseistani
illative posseeni posseihini
adessive possellani posseillani
ablative posseltani posseiltani
allative posselleni posseilleni
essive possenani posseinani
translative possekseni posseikseni
abessive possettani posseittani
instructive
comitative posseineni
second-person singular possessor
singular plural
nominative possesi possesi
accusative nom. possesi possesi
gen. possesi
genitive possesi possejesi
posseisirare
partitive posseasi possejasi
inessive possessasi posseissasi
elative possestasi posseistasi
illative posseesi posseihisi
adessive possellasi posseillasi
ablative posseltasi posseiltasi
allative possellesi posseillesi
essive possenasi posseinasi
translative posseksesi posseiksesi
abessive possettasi posseittasi
instructive
comitative posseinesi
first-person plural possessor
singular plural
nominative possemme possemme
accusative nom. possemme possemme
gen. possemme
genitive possemme possejemme
posseimmerare
partitive posseamme possejamme
inessive possessamme posseissamme
elative possestamme posseistamme
illative posseemme posseihimme
adessive possellamme posseillamme
ablative posseltamme posseiltamme
allative possellemme posseillemme
essive possenamme posseinamme
translative posseksemme posseiksemme
abessive possettamme posseittamme
instructive
comitative posseinemme
second-person plural possessor
singular plural
nominative possenne possenne
accusative nom. possenne possenne
gen. possenne
genitive possenne possejenne
posseinnerare
partitive posseanne possejanne
inessive possessanne posseissanne
elative possestanne posseistanne
illative posseenne posseihinne
adessive possellanne posseillanne
ablative posseltanne posseiltanne
allative possellenne posseillenne
essive possenanne posseinanne
translative posseksenne posseiksenne
abessive possettanne posseittanne
instructive
comitative posseinenne
third-person possessor
singular plural
nominative possensa possensa
accusative nom. possensa possensa
gen. possensa
genitive possensa possejensa
posseinsarare
partitive posseaan
posseansa
possejaan
possejansa
inessive possessaan
possessansa
posseissaan
posseissansa
elative possestaan
possestansa
posseistaan
posseistansa
illative posseensa posseihinsa
adessive possellaan
possellansa
posseillaan
posseillansa
ablative posseltaan
posseltansa
posseiltaan
posseiltansa
allative posselleen
possellensa
posseilleen
posseillensa
essive possenaan
possenansa
posseinaan
posseinansa
translative possekseen
posseksensa
posseikseen
posseiksensa
abessive possettaan
possettansa
posseittaan
posseittansa
instructive
comitative posseineen
posseinensa

Further reading edit

Franco-Provençal edit

Noun edit

posse f

  1. udder, teat
    Synonym: uvro

Jamaican Creole edit

Etymology edit

From English posse.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpa.sɪ/
  • Hyphenation: po‧sse

Noun edit

posse (plural posse dem, quantified posse)

  1. criminal crew; gang; posse
    Nuh walk inna posse, mi nuh walk inna gang.
    I don't belong to any criminal crews. I don't belong to any gangs.

See also edit

Latin edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

posse

  1. present active infinitive of possum  "to be able (to)"

Noun edit

posse n (indeclinable)

  1. power, ability
  2. potentiality, capability of being
  3. (Late Latin) force, body of men
  4. (Medieval Latin) territory, dominion

References edit

  • "possum", see "Posse as subst. (poet.)"”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • posse in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • Carl Meißner, Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[2], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) to be scarcely able to restrain one's laughter: risum tenere vix posse
    • (ambiguous) to be scarcely able to restrain one's laughter: risum aegre continere posse
    • (ambiguous) to be hardly able to restrain one's tears: lacrimas tenere non posse
    • (ambiguous) to be hardly able to restrain one's tears: fletum cohibere non posse
    • (ambiguous) to be unable to speak for emotion: prae lacrimis loqui non posse
    • (ambiguous) to be unable to sleep: somnum capere non posse
    • (ambiguous) to have great influence with a person; to have considerable weight: multum auctoritate valere, posse apud aliquem
    • (ambiguous) to have great weight as a speaker: multum dicendo valere, posse
    • (ambiguous) to be unable to say all one wants: verbis non omnia exsequi posse
    • (ambiguous) to have a powerful navy: navibus plurimum posse

Portuguese edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Medieval Latin posse (power, ability).

Pronunciation edit

 

  • Hyphenation: pos‧se

Noun edit

posse f (plural posses)

  1. possession, land
  2. (uncountable) ownership
  3. (uncountable, politics) command
    • 2015 November 26, São José Almeida, “Cavaco deverá sublinhar desafios ao dar posse a Costa”, in Público[3]:
      No Palácio da Ajuda, tomarão posse todos os membros do Governo, os 17 ministros e os 41 secretários de Estado, numa cerimónia conjunta à imagem do que aconteceu a 30 de Outubro, com o XX Governo, liderado por Pedro Passos Coelho.
      (please add an English translation of this quotation)