See also: hér, hèr, hær, her-, Her, HER, and H.E.R.

Translingual edit

Symbol edit

her

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-2 & ISO 639-3 language code for Herero.

English edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Middle English here, hir, hire, from Old English hire (her), from Proto-Germanic *hezōi (dative and genitive singular of *hijō). Cognate with North Frisian hör, Saterland Frisian hier, hiere (her), West Frisian har (her), Dutch haar (her), German Low German hör (her), German ihr (her).

Pronunciation edit

Determiner edit

her

  1. Belonging to her (belonging to that female, or in poetic or old-fashioned language that ship, city, season, etc).
    This is her book
    • 1928, The Journal of the American Dental Association, page 765:
      Prodigal in everything, summer spreads her blessings with lavish unconcern, and waving her magic wand across the landscape of the world, she bids the sons of men to enter in [...]
    • 1932, Delos W. Lovelace, King Kong, published 1965, page 1:
      Her crew knew that deep in her heart beat engines fit and able to push her blunt old nose ahead at a sweet fourteen knots, come Hell or high water.
    • 2001, Betsy Gould Hearne, Wishes, Kisses, and Pigs, Simon and Schuster, →ISBN, page 78:
      On top of the circle she wrote her name, Louise, just above where the 12 on a clock would be.
    • 2010, Andrew Lambert, Nelson: Britannia's God of War, Faber & Faber, →ISBN:
      On 24 April Nelson rejoined his ship, her battle damage repaired []
  2. Belonging to a person of unspecified gender (to counterbalance the traditional "his" in this sense).
    • 2017, David Yellin, Essentials of Integrating the Language Arts, page 115:
      Begin by having students choose a short poem to memorize; they will enjoy searching the library for a poem that appeals to them. If a student wishes to memorize her poem and share it aloud with the rest of the class, suggest a buddy system.

Translations edit

See also edit

Pronoun edit

her

  1. The form of she used after a preposition, as the object of a verb, or (colloquial) as a subject with a conjunction; that woman, that ship, etc.
    Give it to her (after preposition)
    He wrote her a letter (indirect object)
    He treated her for a cold (direct object)
    Him and her went for a walk (with a conjunction; deprecated)
    • February 1896, Ground-swells, by Jeannette H. Walworth, published in Lippincott's Monthly Magazine; page 183:
      "Then what became of her?"
      "Her? Which ‘her’? The park is full of ‘hers’."
      "The lady with the green feathers in her hat. A big Gainsborough hat. I am quite sure it was Miss Hartuff."
    • 1950, C. S. Lewis, The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe:
      "It's all right," he was shouting. "Come out, Mrs. Beaver. Come out, Sons and Daughters of Adam and Eve. It's all right! It isn't her!" This was bad grammar of course, but that is how beavers talk when they are excited; I mean, in Narnia—in our world they usually don't talk at all.
    • 2013, James Tully, The Crimes of Charlotte Brontë:
      Every day I had to watch as him and her went off for long walks together, and each night I had to go to my lonely, cold bed with the thought that they were sharing the same one []

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

Noun edit

her (plural hers)

  1. (informal) A female person or animal.
    I think this bird is a him, but it may be a her.
    • 1986, Hélène Cixous, Sorties (translated)
      [] daring dizzying passages in other, fleeting and passionate dwellings within the hims and hers whom she inhabits []
    • 2004, Charles J. Sullivan, Love and Survival, page 68:
      By this time, she had so many questions, but she only hit him up for one answer about those “hims” and “hers.” She asked, “Do both hims and hers reproduce hummers?”

Synonyms edit

Anagrams edit

Aromanian edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Latin ferrum. Compare Daco-Romanian fier, Spanish hierro.

Noun edit

her n (plural heari or heare)

  1. iron

Related terms edit

Cornish edit

Noun edit

her

  1. Mixed mutation of ger.

Czech edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

her f

  1. genitive plural of hra

Danish edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse hér.

Pronunciation edit

  This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

Adverb edit

her

  1. here

Related terms edit

Dutch edit

Pronunciation edit

Adverb edit

her

  1. here

Usage notes edit

  • Not in common usage, "hier" is rather used. "her" is only used in expressions like the ones below.

Derived terms edit

Faroese edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Norse hér.

Adverb edit

her

  1. here

Etymology 2 edit

From herur.

Noun edit

her

  1. indefinite accusative singular of herur

German edit

Etymology edit

From Old High German hera. Cognate to German Low German her.

Pronunciation edit

Adverb edit

her

  1. hither, to this place, to here, to me/us
    Komm her!
    Come here!
  2. ago
    Es ist zehn Jahre her, dass ich das letzte Mal Auto gefahren bin.
    Ten years ago was the last time I drove a car.

Antonyms edit

Derived terms edit

See also edit

Further reading edit

  • her” in Duden online
  • her” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

Gothic edit

Romanization edit

hēr

  1. Romanization of 𐌷𐌴𐍂

Icelandic edit

 
Icelandic Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia is

Etymology edit

From Old Norse herr.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

her m (genitive singular hers, nominative plural herir)

  1. army, military

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

Limburgish edit

Etymology edit

From hieër.

Noun edit

her m

  1. vocative singular of hieër

Middle English edit

Etymology 1 edit

Inherited from Old English hǣr, from Proto-West Germanic *hār, from Proto-Germanic *hērą.

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

her (plural heres)

  1. (countable) a hair (follicular growth on the skin)
  2. (uncountable) hair (follicular growths on the skin)
  3. pelt, hide, animal skin
  4. Something similar in appearance to hair (e.g. a botanical hair)
  5. (figurative) small part, any part (of a person)
Related terms edit
Descendants edit
  • English: hair
  • Scots: hair, hayr, hare
  • Yola: haar

References edit

Etymology 2 edit

Inherited from Old English hēr, from Proto-West Germanic *hēr, from Proto-Germanic *hē₂r.

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Adverb edit

her

  1. here
Descendants edit

References edit

Etymology 3 edit

Determiner edit

her

  1. Alternative form of hire (her, genitive)

Pronoun edit

her

  1. Alternative form of hire (hers)

Etymology 4 edit

Pronoun edit

her

  1. Alternative form of hire (her, object)

Etymology 5 edit

Determiner edit

her

  1. Alternative form of here (their)

Etymology 6 edit

Adjective edit

her

  1. Alternative form of here (pleasant)

Etymology 7 edit

Noun edit

her (plural heres)

  1. Alternative form of here (haircloth)

Etymology 8 edit

Noun edit

her

  1. Alternative form of herre (hinge)

Etymology 9 edit

Noun edit

her

  1. Alternative form of here (army)

Etymology 10 edit

Noun edit

her (plural heres)

  1. Alternative form of heir (heir)

Etymology 11 edit

Verb edit

her

  1. Alternative form of heren (to hear)

Etymology 12 edit

Adjective edit

her

  1. comparative degree of he (high)

North Frisian edit

Pronoun edit

her

  1. her: third-person singular, feminine, objective
  2. her: third-person singular, feminine, possesive

Northern Kurdish edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Indo-Iranian *sárwas.

Adverb edit

Central Kurdish هەر (her)

her

  1. every, each
  2. anyone
  3. anyway

Norwegian Bokmål edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse hér.

Pronunciation edit

Adverb edit

her

  1. here

Derived terms edit

References edit

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Norse hér.

Adverb edit

her

  1. here
    Det er fint å vera her.
    It's nice to be here.
  2. just now, recently
    Eg såg ho her ein dag.
    I saw her just the other day.

Etymology 2 edit

Noun edit

her m (definite singular heren, indefinite plural herar, definite plural herane)

  1. (pre-2012) alternative form of hær

References edit

Old English edit

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Proto-West Germanic *hēr, from Proto-Germanic *hē₂r, apparently from the stem *hi- (this); the exact formation is unclear. Cognate with Old Saxon hēr, Old High German hiar, Old Norse hér, Gothic 𐌷𐌴𐍂 (hēr).

Adverb edit

hēr

  1. here
    • late 10th century, Ælfric, the Old English Hexateuch, Genesis 46:2
      God hine ġehīerde and cleopode hine and cwæþ tō him, "Iācōb, Iācōb"! And hē him andswarode and cwæþ, "Hēr iċ eom!"
      God heard him and called out, "Jacob, Jacob!" And he answered him and said, "Here I am!"
Descendants edit

Etymology 2 edit

Noun edit

hēr n

  1. Alternative form of hǣr

Old Frisian edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-West Germanic *hār. Cognates include Old English hǣr, Old Saxon hār and Old Dutch hār.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈheːr/, [ˈhɛːr]

Noun edit

hēr n

  1. hair

Descendants edit

References edit

  • Bremmer, Rolf H. (2009) An Introduction to Old Frisian: History, Grammar, Reader, Glossary, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, →ISBN

Old High German edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Proto-Germanic *hairaz.

Adjective edit

hēr (comparative hērro or hērōro)

  1. gray-haired, old
  2. noble, venerable
Declension edit
Descendants edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Proto-West Germanic *hiʀ, from Proto-Germanic *hiz.

Pronoun edit

her

  1. (northern dialects) Alternative form of er
Descendants edit
  • Middle High German: hër, he
    • Central Franconian:
      • Moselle Franconian: ä, en (from the accusative)
        Eifelisch: hän, hen, en
      • Ripuarian:
        Aachensch: he
        Kölsch: , ä
    • East Central German:
      Lusatian-New Marchian:
      Thuringian:
      North Thuringian: he,
    • Rhine Franconian:
      Hessian:
      Low Hessian: he,
      South Hessian: he
    • Vilamovian: hār

Old Norse edit

Noun edit

her

  1. accusative/dative singular of herr

Salar edit

Etymology edit

From Persian هر (har). Cognate with Bengali হর (hor, every), Latin salvus (safe, whole), Ancient Greek ὅλος (hólos, complete, whole).

Pronunciation edit

  • (Jiezi, Gaizi, Mengda, Chahandusi, Hanbahe, Baizhuang, Xunhua, Qinghai) IPA(key): [her]
  • (Mengda, Xunhua, Qinghai) IPA(key): [heɹ]
  • (Baizhuang, Xunhua, Qinghai) IPA(key): [hær]
  • (Qingshui, Xunhua, Qinghai) IPA(key): [hɑ]

Adjective edit

her

  1. every

Derived terms edit

References edit

  • Tenishev, Edhem (1976), “her”, in Stroj salárskovo jazyká [Grammar of Salar], Moscow, pages 333-334

Turkish edit

Etymology edit

From Ottoman Turkish هر, from Persian هر (har). Cognate with Bengali হর (hor, every), Latin salvus (safe, whole), Ancient Greek ὅλος (hólos, complete, whole).

Pronunciation edit

Determiner edit

her

  1. every
  2. each

Volapük edit

Noun edit

her (nominative plural hers)

  1. hair

Declension edit

Welsh edit

Etymology edit

Compare English here, used in an interjectory sense as in "here! shoo! go on!"

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

her f (plural heriau, not mutable)

  1. challenge

References edit

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “her”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

Yola edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English here, from Old English hire, from Proto-West Germanic *heʀē.

Pronoun edit

her

  1. her
    • 1867, “THE BRIDE'S PORTION”, in SONGS, ETC. IN THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, pages 102[1]:
      A portion ich gae her, was (it's now ich have ee-tolth)
      The portion I gave her was (it's now I have told)

Etymology 2 edit

From Middle English hire, from Old English hire, from Proto-West Germanic *heʀā.

Determiner edit

her

  1. her
    • 1927, “ZONG OF TWI MAARKEET MOANS”, in THE ANCIENT DIALECT OF THE BARONIES OF FORTH AND BARGY, COUNTY WEXFORD, page 129, lines 6[2]:
      An awi gome her egges wi a wheel an car taape,
      And away went her eggs, with the car overset.
    • 1927, “ZONG OF TWI MAARKEET MOANS”, in THE ANCIENT DIALECT OF THE BARONIES OF FORTH AND BARGY, COUNTY WEXFORD, page 129, lines 8[2]:
      Shu ztaared, clappu her baashes an up wi punaan,
      She stared, clapped her palms, and up with lament,

References edit

  1. ^ Jacob Poole (d. 1827) (before 1828), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, published 1867
  2. 2.0 2.1 Kathleen A. Browne (1927) The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland Sixth Series, Vol.17 No.2, Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland

Zazaki edit

Etymology 1 edit

Related to Persian هر (har).

Adjective edit

her

  1. each

Etymology 2 edit

Related to Persian خر (xar).

Noun edit

her

  1. donkey