See also: Regal, regał, regál, and régal

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɹiːɡəl/
    • (file)

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English regal, from Old French regal (regal, royal), from Latin rēgālis (royal, kingly), from rex (king); also regere (to rule). Doublet of royal (belonging to a monarch) and real (unit of currency). Cognate with Spanish real.

AdjectiveEdit

regal (comparative more regal, superlative most regal)

  1. Of or relating to royalty.
    regal authority;   the regal title
  2. Befitting a king, queen, emperor, or empress.
    • 2013 August 10, Lexington, “Keeping the mighty honest”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8848:
      The [Washington] Post's proprietor through those turbulent [Watergate] days, Katharine Graham, held a double place in Washington’s hierarchy: at once regal Georgetown hostess and scrappy newshound, ready to hold the establishment to account.
    • 2018 July 14, Lineker, Gary, Twitter[1], retrieved 2018-07-15:
      Terrific movement from The Queen here. Gets behind the defender, goes one way then cuts back inside. Regal attacking play.
  3. Befitting a king, or emperor.
    • c. 1898, Truth, column 2:
      The children to whom I acted as cicerone almost screamed with glee as they saw the four-and-twenty blackbirds emerging from the pie-crust in front of the astonished King; and when the climax of the inconsequential story was reached, by way of the regal counting house and the “reginal” parlour, and a blackbird (presumably one of the four-and-twenty that had been temporarily immured in the pie) was seen about to revenge himself on the innocent nose of the guiltless laundry-maid, a veritable climax of enthusiasm was reached.
    • c. 1947, Hobbies, page 27, column 1:
      The crown seals, a regal crown and a reginal crown are unengraved, but from the motif I judge they symbolize King William III of England and Queen Mary, (see 1688, English History) who formerly ruled Holland as Prince William, Consort, and Queen Mary — The House of Orange.
    • 1973, Journal of the American Research Center in Egypt, page 78, column 2:
      In any case, the discrepancy might be explained by the fact that the 9th pylon has not yet disgorged all it blocks; it is in the talatat from this pylon that the masonry of the essentially regal (as opposed to reginal) temples Tni-mnw and Rwd-mnw predominate.
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Etymology 2Edit

From Middle French régale, possibly from Old French regol (a gutter, channel).

NounEdit

regal (plural regals)

  1. (music) A small, portable organ whose sound is produced by beating reeds without amplifying resonators. Its tone is keen and rich in harmonics. The regal was common in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries; today it has been revived for the performance of music from those times.
  2. An organ stop of the reed family, furnished with a normal beating reed, but whose resonator is a fraction of its natural length. In the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries these stops took a multitude of forms. Today only one survives that is of universal currency, the so-called Vox Humana.
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CatalanEdit

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NounEdit

regal m (plural regals)

  1. present; gift

Related termsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin rēgālis. Compare the inherited reial, roial.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

regal m (oblique and nominative feminine singular regale)

  1. regal

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DescendantsEdit

  • English: regal

RomanianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Latin rēgālis.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

regal m or n (feminine singular regală, masculine plural regali, feminine and neuter plural regale)

  1. royal
  2. regal

DeclensionEdit

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Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from French régal.

NounEdit

regal n (plural regale)

  1. feast
  2. banquet