See also: Regal, regał, regál, and régal

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɹiːɡəl/
    • (file)

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English regal, borrowed from Old French regal (regal, royal), from Latin rēgālis (royal, kingly), from rex (king); also regere (to rule). Doublet of royal (belonging to a monarch) and real (unit of currency). Cognate with Spanish real.

AdjectiveEdit

regal (comparative more regal, superlative most regal)

  1. Of or relating to royalty.
    regal authority;   the regal title
  2. Befitting a king, queen, emperor, or empress.
    • 2013 August 10, Lexington, “Keeping the mighty honest”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8848:
      The [Washington] Post's proprietor through those turbulent [Watergate] days, Katharine Graham, held a double place in Washington’s hierarchy: at once regal Georgetown hostess and scrappy newshound, ready to hold the establishment to account.
    • 2018 July 14, Lineker, Gary, Twitter[1], retrieved 2018-07-15:
      Terrific movement from The Queen here. Gets behind the defender, goes one way then cuts back inside. Regal attacking play.
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Probably from Old French regol (a gutter, channel)

NounEdit

regal (plural regals)

  1. (music) A small, portable organ whose sound is produced by beating reeds without amplifying resonators. Its tone is keen and rich in harmonics. The regal was common in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries; today it has been revived for the performance of music from those times.
  2. An organ stop of the reed family, furnished with a normal beating reed, but whose resonator is a fraction of its natural length. In the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries these stops took a multitude of forms. Today only one survives that is of universal currency, the so-called Vox Humana.
TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

regal m (plural regals)

  1. present; gift

Related termsEdit


NovialEdit

EtymologyEdit

Derived from rege (monarch, king or queen)

Root: reg-

Morphemes: reg- +‎ -al

AdjectiveEdit

regal

  1. regal, royal

Related termsEdit

  • rege (monarch, noun)
  • rego (king, noun)
  • rega (queen, noun)
  • regia (kingdom, noun)
  • regira (reign, verb)
  • regido (royal prince, noun)
  • regida (royal princess, noun)
  • viserego (viceroy, noun)
  • regonal (kingly, adjective)
  • reganal (queenly, adjective)

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin rēgālis. Compare the inherited reial, roial.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

regal m (oblique and nominative feminine singular regale)

  1. regal

SynonymsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: regal

RomanianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Latin rēgālis.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

regal m or n (feminine singular regală, masculine plural regali, feminine and neuter plural regale)

  1. royal
  2. regal

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from French régal.

NounEdit

regal n (plural regale)

  1. feast
  2. banquet