See also: Regime, régime, and régimé

EnglishEdit

 
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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French régime, from Latin regimen (direction, government). Doublet of regimen.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɹəˈʒiːm/, /ɹeɪˈʒiːm/, /ˈɹeɪʒiːm/
    • (file)
    • (file)
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iːm

NounEdit

regime (plural regimes)

  1. Mode of rule or management.
    a prison regime
  2. A form of government, or the government in power.
    a totalitarian regime
  3. A period of rule.
  4. A regulated system; a regimen.
    a fitness regime
    Heaven will eliminate the tyrannical regimes.
    • 2013 June 7, Joseph Stiglitz, “Globalisation is about taxes too”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 188, number 26, page 19:
      It is time the international community faced the reality: we have an unmanageable, unfair, distortionary global tax regime. It is a tax system that is pivotal in creating the increasing inequality that marks most advanced countries today […].
    • 2017: "The Cake Is Just the Beginning" by Mark Joseph Stern, Slate
      Gorsuch’s theory would hobble this nondiscrimination regime by preventing the government from directing employers to tell employees about their rights and responsibilities under law.
  5. A division of a Mafia crime family, led by a caporegime.
  6. (hydrology) A set of characteristics.
    A typical annual water level regime would include a gradual summer drawdown beginning in early May.

Usage notesEdit

  • When regime is used in the sense of a form or instance of government or state, it is usually meant as a pejorative, and may be intended to brand that government or state as illegitimate or authoritarian. Some usage commentators prescribe that when regime is used in the sense of "a regulated system; a regimen," such as for health or fitness regimens, the word regimen should be used instead. But Garner's Modern English Usage, fourth edition, says that the word regime predominates in that sense in British English and that the word regimen predominates in that sense in American English; this difference suggests that that prescription has been taken up more in America than in Britain.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

regime n (singular definite regimet, plural indefinite regimer)

  1. regime

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French régime.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /rəˈʒim/, /reːˈʒim/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: re‧gi‧me
  • Rhymes: -im

NounEdit

regime n (plural regimes, diminutive regimetje n)

  1. regime (political order)
    Synonyms: regeringsstelsel, staatsbestel
  2. regime (undemocratic political order or government)
  3. regimen, diet

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Indonesian: rezim

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin regimen.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

regime m (plural regimi)

  1. regime, régime
  2. regimen

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French régime

NounEdit

regime n (definite singular regimet, indefinite plural regimer, definite plural regima or regimene)

  1. regime (form of government)

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French régime

NounEdit

regime n (definite singular regimet, indefinite plural regime, definite plural regima)

  1. regime (form of government)

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin regimen. Doublet of regímen.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

regime m (plural regimes)

  1. regime (mode of rule or management)
  2. regime (form of government)
  3. regime (period of rule)
  4. diet (controlled regimen of food and drink)
    Synonym: dieta

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • regime” in Dicionário Aberto based on Novo Diccionário da Língua Portuguesa de Cândido de Figueiredo, 1913