regimen

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin regimen ‎(guidance”, “direction”, “government”, “rule), from regō ‎(I rule”, “I direct); compare regular.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

regimen ‎(plural regimens or regimina)

  1. Orderly government; system of order; administration.
  2. Any regulation or remedy which is intended to produce beneficial effects by gradual operation.
    • 1832, The Edinburgh Review (page 470)
      Seven or eight annual bloodings, and as many purgations — such was the common regimen the theory prescribed to ensure continuance of health []
  3. (grammar) object
    • The Popular Educator. A Complete Encyclopaedia of Elementary, Advanced, and Technical Education. New and Revised Edition. Volume III., page 394 (Lessions in French.---LVIII. § 42.---Of Verbs):
      (3.) Verbs admit two kinds of regimen: the direct regimen and the indirect regimen. (4.) The direct regimen, or immediate object [...] (5.) The indirect regimen, or remote object [....]
    • 1828, J. V. Douville, The Speaking French Grammar, forming a series of sixty explanatory lessons, with colloquial essays, third edition, London, page 84 and 315:
      Active verbs express an action which an agent, called the nominative or subject, performs on an object or regimen, without the help of a preposition: as,--- Pierre aime Sophie, Peter loves Sophia. [...] Of the Object or Regimen of Verbs.
    • 1831 and 1854, A. Bolmar, A Book of the French Verbs, Wherein the Model Verbs, and Several of the Most Difficult Are Conjugated Affirmatively, Negatively, Interrogatively, an Negatively and Interrogatively. and A Book of the French Verbs, Wherein the Model Verbs, and Several of the Most Difficult Are Conjugated Affirmatively, Negatively, Interrogatively, an Negatively and Interrogatively. A New Edition, Philadelphia, page 2:
      15. A verb is active in French when it expresses that an agent called nominative, or subject, performs an action on an object, or regimen, without the help of a preposition---as, Jean frappe Joseph, John strikes Joseph, &c.
    • 1847, M. Josse, A Grammar of the Spanish Language with Practical Exercises. First Part, page 51:
      Pronouns may be nominatives, and of the direct or indirect regimen.
  4. (grammar) A syntactical relation between words, as when one depends on another and is regulated by it in respect to case or mood; government.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From regō ‎(I rule”, “I direct).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

regimen n ‎(genitive regiminis); third declension

  1. control, steering
  2. directing
  3. rule; governance

DeclensionEdit

Third declension neuter.

Case Singular Plural
nominative regimen regimina
genitive regiminis regiminum
dative regiminī regiminibus
accusative regimen regimina
ablative regimine regiminibus
vocative regimen regimina

DescendantsEdit


SwedishEdit

NounEdit

regimen

  1. definite singular of regim
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