EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Old French repast, from the verb repaistre, from Latin repascere, from pascere (to graze).

PronunciationEdit

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NounEdit

repast (countable and uncountable, plural repasts)

  1. (now literary) A meal.
  2. (archaic, uncountable) The food eaten at a meal.
    • (Can we date this quote by William Shakespeare and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Go and get me some repast.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

repast (third-person singular simple present repasts, present participle repasting, simple past and past participle repasted)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To supply food to; to feast.
    • (Can we date this quote by William Shakespeare and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Repast them with my blood.
  2. (obsolete, intransitive) To take food.
    • (Can we date this quote by John Milton and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      He then, also, as before, left arbitrary the dieting and repasting of our minds.

AnagramsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

repast m (oblique plural repaz or repatz, nominative singular repaz or repatz, nominative plural repast)

  1. a meal
    • circa 1170, Wace, Le Roman de Rou:
      Mez li Dus ne vout prendre ne disner ne repast.
      But the Duke didn't want to eat dinner or any other meal.

DescendantsEdit

  • English: repast
  • French: repas