Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin scabrosus, same root as scab.

PronunciationEdit

  This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with enPR or the IPA then please add some!

AdjectiveEdit

scabrous (comparative more scabrous, superlative most scabrous)

  1. covered with scales or scabs, or otherwise extremely physically rough
    After the incident with the gasoline, Noel's burnt arm remained scabrous, and was susceptible to infections.
  2. having indecent sexual content or connotation, rough
    • 2017 January 19, Peter Bradshaw, “T2 Trainspotting review – choose a sequel that doesn't disappoint”, in the Guardian[1]:
      What began as a zeitgeisty outlaw romp in the Uncool Britannia of the 1990s is now reborn as a scabrous and brutal black comedy about middle-aged male disappointment and fear of death.
    The novel was a flagrantly scabrous bodice-ripper, and Rachael was ashamed to read it in public.
  3. (figuratively) harsh; unmusical
    • 1697, John Dryden translating Virgil, Dedication of the Aeneis
      His verse is scabrous and hobbling.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit