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Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English scrien, scryen, a shortened form of Middle English ascrien, from Old French escrier. Influenced by Middle English descrien (to descry).

VerbEdit

scry (third-person singular simple present scries, present participle scrying, simple past and past participle scried)

  1. To predict the future using crystal balls or other objects.
    The fortune teller claimed she could scry [into] the future.
  2. (obsolete) To descry; to see.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Spenser to this entry?)

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English ascry, ascrie, escrie, from Anglo-Norman ascri, from Old French escri.

NounEdit

scry (plural scries)

  1. (obsolete) A cry or shout.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Ld. Berners to this entry?)
  2. A flock of wildfowl.

VerbEdit

scry (third-person singular simple present scries, present participle scrying, simple past and past participle scried)

  1. (obsolete) To proclaim.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for scry in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

AnagramsEdit