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Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

semis

  1. plural of semi

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Latin sēmis.

NounEdit

semis (plural semises)

  1. (historical) A small bronze coin minted during the Roman Republic, valued at half an as.
TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin sēmis.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

semis m (plural semis)

  1. (agriculture) A technique for planting seeds on a terrain.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From sēmi- (half) + as (a whole, a farthing)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sēmis m (genitive sēmissis); third declension

  1. a half, a half-unit
  2. a coin worth half an ās

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative sēmis sēmissēs
Genitive sēmissis sēmissum
Dative sēmissī sēmissibus
Accusative sēmissem sēmissēs
Ablative sēmisse sēmissibus
Vocative sēmis sēmissēs

ReferencesEdit

  • semis in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • semis in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • semis in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • 6 per cent (i.e. if for 100 denarii, asses, one pays half a denarius, half an as per month): semisses
    • money is plentiful at 6 per cent: semissibus magna copia est
    • 6 per cent: usurae semisses (Jurists)

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin sēmis

NounEdit

semis m (plural semis)

  1. semis

SwedishEdit

NounEdit

semis

  1. indefinite genitive singular of semi

AnagramsEdit