Open main menu

AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sentīre, present active infinitive of sentiō.

VerbEdit

sentir

  1. to feel (an emotion)
  2. to sense
  3. to hear
  4. to feel, reckon

Related termsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan sentir, from Latin sentīre, present active infinitive of sentiō, from Proto-Indo-European *sent- (to feel).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

sentir (first-person singular present sento, past participle sentit)

  1. to sense
  2. to feel
  3. to hear of something
  4. to regret, be sorry

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French sentir, from Latin sentīre, present active infinitive of sentiō, from Proto-Indo-European *sent- (to feel).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /sɑ̃.tiʁ/
  • (file)

VerbEdit

sentir

  1. (intransitive) to smell (to have a certain odor)
    Ça sent bon.It smells good.
  2. (transitive) to taste
  3. (transitive) to feel (physical perception)
  4. (transitive) to smell of, taste of
    Ce repas sent l'ail.This meal smells/tastes of garlic.
  5. (transitive, informal) to smack of; to indicate, foreshadow
    Ça sent la pluie.It looks like rain.
  6. (transitive) to have the character, manner, feeling or appearance of; to give a feeling of
    • 1837, Louis Viardot, L’Ingénieux Hidalgo Don Quichotte de la Manchefr.Wikisource, translation of El ingenioso hidalgo Don Quijote de la Mancha by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, Volume I, Chapter I:
      Lui cherchant alors un nom qui ne s’écartât pas trop du sien, qui sentît et représentât la grande dame et la princesse, il vint à l’appeler Dulcinée du Toboso, parce qu’elle était native de ce village : nom harmonieux à son avis, rare et distingué, et non moins expressif que tous ceux qu’il avait donnés à son équipage et à lui-même.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
      Through searching himself thus for a name that did not diverge too much from his own, that would give a feeling of and represent the great lady and princess, he came to call her Dulcinea del Toboso, because she was a native of this village [Toboso]: a name in his opinion harmonious, rare and distinguished, and no less expressive than all the ones that he had given to his team and to himself.
  7. (transitive) to feel, be aware of, be conscious of
  8. (reflexive) to feel (in oneself)
  9. (reflexive) to show, be felt (of effect, improvement etc.)

ConjugationEdit

This is one of a fairly large group of irregular -ir verbs that are all conjugated the same way. Other members of this group include sortir and dormir. The most significant difference between these verbs' conjugation and that of the regular -ir verbs is that these verbs' conjugation does not use the infix -iss-. Further, this conjugation has the forms (je, tu) sens and (il) sent in the present indicative and imperative, whereas a regular -ir verb would have *sentis and *sentit (as in the past historic).

HyponymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese sentir, from Latin sentīre, present active infinitive of sentiō, from Proto-Indo-European *sent- (to feel).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

sentir (first-person singular present sinto, first-person singular preterite sentín, past participle sentido)

  1. to hear
    Non te sentín ao chegares!I didn't hear you coming in!
  2. to sense, perceive
  3. to feel
  4. first/third-person singular future subjunctive of sentir
  5. first/third-person singular personal infinitive of sentir

ConjugationEdit

ReferencesEdit


IdoEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

sentir

  1. past infinitive of sentar

ItalianEdit

VerbEdit

sentir

  1. Apocopic form of sentire

AnagramsEdit


OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan sentir, from Latin sentīre, present active infinitive of sentiō.

VerbEdit

sentir

  1. to feel (have a feeling)
  2. to smell

ConjugationEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sentīre, present active infinitive of sentiō.

VerbEdit

sentir

  1. to feel (have a feeling)
  2. to smell

ConjugationEdit

This verb conjugates as a third-group verb. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

DescendantsEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese sentir, from Latin sentīre, present active infinitive of sentiō, from Proto-Indo-European *sent- (to head for, go).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

sentir (first-person singular present indicative sinto, past participle sentido)

  1. (transitive) to sense; to feel (to perceive by means of biological senses)
    Sentes o cheiro de carne cozinhando?Can you feel the smell of meat being cooked?
    Synonym: perceber
  2. (specifically, transitive) to feel (to feel with the skin or hands)
    Senti alguma coisa na água.I felt something in the water.
    Synonym: encostar em (usually when actively touching something)
  3. (transitive) to feel (to experience an emotion or feeling [noun])
    Você nunca sentirá a dor de perder um filho.You will never feel the pain of losing a child.
    Synonym: passar por
  4. (copulative, takes a reflexive pronoun) to feel (to experience an emotion or feeling [adjective])
    Eu me sinto muito cansado no final do dia.I feel very tired at the end of the day.
  5. (subordinating) to feel; to think (to vaguely expect that something is the case or will happen)
    Sinto que não há nada que possamos fazer.I feel that there is nothing we can do.
    O problema é que ela sente que ninguém virá.The problem is that she thinks no one will come.
    achar (usually expresses more certainty)pensar (usually expresses more certainty)
  6. (transitive) to feel (to experience the consequences of)
    Sinta a minha ira!Feel my wrath!
    Synonym: sofrer
  7. (transitive) to be offended by (a comment)
    Synonyms: magoar-se, ofender-se, ressentir
  8. (chiefly sports, transitive or intransitive) to be significantly harmed by
    Parece que Cristiano Ronaldo sentiu a pancada.It seems that Cristiano Ronaldo has felt the blow [such that he won’t be able to brush it off].
  9. (usually sentir muito, intransitive, or transitive with por) to be sorry, regretful
    Sinto muito.I’m sorry.
    Nós sentimos pela perda de sua encomenda.We are sorry for the loss of the product you ordered.
  10. (parapsychology, transitive or subordinating) to foretell; to foresee
    Synonyms: pressentir, adivinhar

ConjugationEdit

QuotationsEdit

For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:sentir.

HyponymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sentīre, present active infinitive of sentiō, from Proto-Indo-European *sent- (to feel).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /senˈtiɾ/, [sẽn̪ˈt̪iɾ]

VerbEdit

sentir (first-person singular present siento, first-person singular preterite sentí, past participle sentido)

  1. (transitive) to feel
  2. (transitive) to regret, feel/be sorry
  3. (transitive) to hear
  4. (reflexive) to feel

ConjugationEdit

  • Rule: e becomes a ie in stressed syllables and i in certain conjugations.
  • Rule: e becomes a ie in stressed syllables and i in certain conjugations.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit


VenetianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sentīre, present active infinitive of sentiō. Compare Italian sentire

VerbEdit

sentir

  1. (transitive) to hear
  2. (transitive) to feel

ConjugationEdit

  • Venetian conjugation varies from one region to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.